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Full text of "Maids and a Man 1939"

? 3 T8 



rUflilAN JR. H\C,t' SCffOOl UBfWK) 



1939 






Marguerite Symms 

Editor-in-Chief 
Dorothy Ann ! 
Business Maiia 



PRESEN 




I 



riNG FOR 1939.... 




YEARBOOK OF TUBMAN 
HIGH SCHOOL 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS 





^^'ithin these pages, it has heen the intention 
of the 1939 Staff of "Maids and a Man" to attempt 
the expression in concrete form of the staff's own 
ideas concerning- a superior annual ; to explain to 
interested friends of the school, outside of Tubman, 
the manner and very embodiment of life at this 
institution; and especially to provide for the student 
body something to which they may refer, during 
the vears after they have left here, as the substan- 
tiation and crystallization of their memories of 
Tubman High School. 




(^U^^^COA. 



To 

MISS ELIZABETH DOWLING 

we, 

the Senior Class of Tubman 
High School, 

offer this book as an expression 
of our admiration. 





CP^Jci^oc^ 



School 

Classes 

Features 

Activities 

Advertisements 



CM.e School 



"Mm 




Of Jjrief ULLstoru 



OF TUBMAN HIGH IN 




Co-education in American public schools is 99.44 per cent pure. 
That is to say, these schools are nearly all co-educational. More than a 
thousand public high schools are now members of the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Of this number, only eight or 
ten are for girls only. Tubman is one of this small number. It is 
a safe guess that many other high schools would like to be in this select 
company. When love breaks out in adolescent life, the wisest school 
administrator is sometimes put to his wits' end to know whether to 
treat it as an emotional or a physical rash, or both. 

Tubman High School began its career in 1874 in a church. Its 
enrollment has grown from 35 to 1,200 in these sixty-three years. The 
school is named for Mrs. Emily Tubman, a native of Kentucky and a 
ward of Henry Clay, who was married in Augusta and lived the remain- 
der of a long life here. Airs. Tubman purchased a small Christian 
church building and site valued at twehe thousand dollars and presented 
it to the Board of Education to be used as a high school for girls. Prior 
to that time "female education" had been carried on by private teachers 
and in a few private "seminaries of learning." In reporting this generous 
gift, the superintendent of schools expressed the opinion that "It surely ought to settle for all time 
the high school question in the city of Augusta." 

The first faculty consisted of "one male and one female." In 1877 the first class of six girls was 
graduated. They had "completed with satisfaction to those in authority" a three years' course. This 
is what they had studied : 

First Year. .Arithmetic, spelling and defining, Latin, French, rhetoric, natural philosophy, pen- 
manshij), reading, history. 

Second Year. Arithmetic, algebra, synonyms, Latin, French, natural philosophy, physical 
geograph}', penmanship, reading, history. 

Third Year. Algelira, Latin, French, English literatvu-e. physical geography, chemistry, astron- 
omy, penmanship, reading, history, critical course in parsing. 

Students could choose between Latin and French. Calisthenics twice a week was required of all 
students. Wand drills and dumb-bell exercises were popular numbers on the program of frequent 
public exhibitions. Girls were allowed to remove tlieir corsets and bustles for these exercises. No 
other concession was made to freedom of movement or to display of form. Bloomers were unknown. 
The mod'crn une-piece gym suit was undreamed of. 

The course of study seems to have been practically unchanged dur- 
ing the first twenty years. There was no science laboratory of any 
kind. A wall map of the United States and a map of the Ancient Roman 
iMupire were all the equipment the school had. Steele's "Fourteen 
Weeks" series of science textbooks was text and laboratory. 

The school seems to have been popular from the beginning. Indeed 
il sunn estal.)lished a place in the affection of the city that made "Tubman 
(;irl>" synonymous with "charm school." The annual commencements 
were events that always packed the "Grand Opera House" to the doors. 
"The sweet girl graduate" was annually written up in the local papers 
as a "vision of loveliness." Here is a tyi^ical commencement program : 
Class Motto: "To Do, Not to Uream." 
Welcome Song — School. 
Salutatory. 

Recitation: ".Xnnir's Ticket." 
Song: "Sweet X'ision of Childhood" — School. 
Recitation : "Dream of Eugene .Aram." 
Song: "Welcome i^retty Primrose" — School. 
Recitation: "Sam X\'eller's X'alentine." 
Song: ".Mpine I Icrd.-nian" — .School. 
Recitritidn : "Little jerry." 
X'aledictory. 
Song: "Dtiwn Aimmg the Lilies" —School. 




THE DAYS BACK WHEN 




history the I'liancial repnrt oi the l'>(iard 
cost (if instruction was about $1.05 per 



and 



nnprox e( 



1. Diiniestic science (cook- 



Address (Local Celebrity). 
Presentation of Prizes. 
Presentation of Diplomas. 
Song: "The Sexered Chain" — School. 
Benediction. 

The school grew slowly. "Woman's 'spear' " was still in 
the home. There she didn't need much education. At Tub- 
man the faculty of "one male and one female" continued to 
teach all sulijects. At the end of the fourth year, the superin- 
tendent of schools reported that the "male" had left the school. 
Another male was elected in his place. 

A fourth year was added to the course of study in 1892. 
"The studies were extended into higher mathematics, history, 
literature, and science, and the course of study required for 
graduation is as high as most of our southern colleges and 
institutions of learning-." (Superintendent's report.) At this 
time a special teacher of physical culture was employed to 
visit the school once a year. A study had disclosed a condition, 
sought now to be remedied, as follows: "By bending over 1)ou'ks and-s-lates-^-iTr-SOhdbi'," the chest 
becomes contracted, the blood flows to the lirain, a:id the extremities Ijecome cold, .\fter a vvhiltUhe 
wooden seats get unctjmfortalile, the brain grows wearv and the girls turn and twist at their <lesks and 
long for bodily action." Hence the course in physical culture "to draw the blood away fr<jn! the brain 
and into the vital organs and limbs." 

For many j-ears during the earlier period of the scliool' 
of Education sho\ved. ai)i>arently with some pride, that the 
pupil per month. In 1937 it is aliout $7.00 per month. 

Twice the original school building (church) was enlarged 
ing) was added to the course of study. This innovation did not at lirst meet with popular approval. 
The comment was fretiuentlv heard that the girls' mothers could "learn their daughters to cook at 
home." Once when the girls left the gas stove burning from Friday afternoon to Monday morning 
the course in cooking came near to being abolisheil as a fire hazard. 

In March 1916, the school Iniilding was destroyed by fire — which, how- 
ever, did not originate in the cooking department. By this fire the school lost 
not only its building luit its grounds as well. It is Ijelieved that this is the 
only case on record where a school lost both its building and grounds by fire. 
The donor of the original liuilding stipulated in the deed she gave the Board 
of Education to the jiroperty that if this site were ever abandoned as a school 
the grounds should l)eci>nie the ]iroperty of the trustees of the Richmond 
Academy, at that time a private school for boys. The I'joard of Education had 
purchased Ijefore the fire a site of eleven acres in another part/of the city upon 
which at some future time to erect a larger and more modern school building. 
Following the fire the school carried on in two .Sunday school buildings, the 
basement of one of the grade schools, and a residence. A bond issue of 
$100,000.00 was voted by the people to provide funds for the erection of the 
new building. This was the first, Init not the last, bond issue voted by the 
citizens of Augusta and Richmond County for school purposes. Naturally, 
there was some opposition by the electorate. When the plans of the new 
building were first published in the local papers, the comment was frequently 
heard: "It's too big; they won't fill a building like that in a hundred years." 
The new building was ready for use in February 1918. In three years it was "filled." The objectors 
had to admit that they had missed their guess by ninety-seven years; which, after all, is not a bad 
guess for the average school critic of the streets. The enrollment l)egan to increase rapidly. In 1918 
there were 312 girls in attendance. Today the enrollment nears the 1,200 mark. The faculty has in- 
creased from one male and one female to forty-one females and one male. From the beginning, the 
school principal has been a man. In the history of the school there have been only four principals. One 
served six years, another three years, a third eighteen years. The present principal is now in his thirty- 
fifth year of service. The local papers sometimes refer to him as a "veteran educator." Time has a 
way of making veterans. T. HARRY G.\RRETT, Principal. 





Of a minis iralion 



Miss Eleanor Boatwright 

:\Iivs Elizal^eth Bosijck 

Miss .\nn Braddy 

Miss Elizabeth Brisendiiie 

Miss .Mabel Byrd 

Miss Bertha Carswell 



]Miss ]\Iarcia Clark 
Miss Gertrude Comey 
Mis? Elizabeth Dowling 
Miss ^lary Evans 
Miss Beulah Fender 
]Miss Sara Fullbrisrht 



T. H. Garrett 
Principal 




^liss Annie Page 

Miss Marguerite Palmer 

Miss I.ora Pearce 



^liss Lera Preston 
Mi^s Edna Rogers 
Miss Grace Strauss 



Miss Alice Sumerau 
Mrs. Flora Thompson 
Miss ^[ild^ed von Kanip 



yylaios auo a JnciYi /pjp 



ana ^acuitij 



Miss Mary Gilliland 

Miss Dorothy Halhert 

Miss Marie HuUiert 

Miss Eugenia Hutto 

Miss Betty Jones 

Miss Doruthv Kellv 



^liss Ruth Kiinliroug-h 
Miss Oralee King 
Aliss Susie Langford 
^liss Amabel Lansdell 
iliss Elna Lombard 
!Miss luanita Luckey 



Miss Ruth :\IcAuliffe 
^liss Mary Miles 
]Miss Mary Miller 
Miss Edith Xachman 
Miss Sarah Xorris 
Mrs. M. M. Owens 




Aliss Dorothy Hains 
Assistant Principal 



Miss Belle Walker 
!Miss Dorothy ^\'ilkinson 
Miss Carolvn White 



.Mrs. Margaret White 
Miss Dorothv Hains 




Miss ^lary Balk 
Secretary 





JjlacK ana CjoLo 

Now we'll gi\'e a cheer for Tubman, 

For the school we love the most. 
Evermore A\e'li sing her praises 

And her name shall be our boast. 
To the top we'll raise her colors 

And her standards e\er hold. 
Then let us gi\-e a rousing cheer 

For the Tubman Black and Gold I 
Then let us give a rousing cheer 

For the Tuliman Black and Gold I 



(Chorus) 

So \\'ith voices knid and strong 
To her name we'll raise a song; 
For to her our hearts belong 

\\'ith a love unt<dd. 
Then we'll cheer for Tubman High 
Ma_\- her spirit ne\-er die; 
Victorious nia_\- fly 

Dear old Mlack and (lold! 



Vclma Ik 



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BARBARA BAILEY 

Modern Language 
Student Council (I): Emblems: T (4), THS (2); 
Spanish Club (4), Girl Reserves (2, I); French Club 
(3). 



HELEN BAILEY 
Modern Language 
Basketball (3), Baseball (3), Volley Ball (3, 2). Rin^ 
Tennis (2). 



COLLEEN BEAZLEY 
Classical 
Student Council (4), Latin Club (4), Dance Club 
(4, 21. 



MARGARET LOUISE BEEI.AND 
Commercial 
Student Council ( I ) ; Annual Staff Senior Represen 
tative (4). 



LOUISE BENTLEY 

Diversified Occupations 

Business Manager Tubman Times (4); Baseball f-^, 

3). Hockey (4), Volley Ball (4); Emblems: T (3), 

H (4), THS (2), 



LUCILE ANNE BLACKWELL 

Modern Language 

Student Council (2, I): Basketball (2, I), Hockey 

(2 I); Emblems: T (2), THS (I); Dance Club (4, 

3. 2). 



MIRIAM BOLGLA 
Modern Language 
Glee Club (I), Dance Club (I), 




MARGARET BORN 
Modern Language 



■s r. N T n n !r 




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AUDREY LOUISE B:^UNKHURST 
Classical 
Volley Ball (2, I]; Emblems: T (2), H (3), S (4), 
FHS (I); Latin Club (4). Glee Club (4, 3, 2). 



DORIS BURNS 
Modern Language 
Volley Ball (3, 2), Ring Tennis (I): Girl Reserves 
(I). 



HELEN BUSBIA 
Classical 
Emblems: T (3), THS (2). 



SARAH BUSBIA 
Modern Languac;e 
Emblems: T (3), THS (2). 



MARJORIE L. BUSSEY 

Diversified Occupations 
Student Council (3): President Junior Class. Vice- 
President Senior Class: Basketball Captain (2, I). 
Baseball Captain (3, 2, I), Member (4), Hockey 
Captain (3, 2, I), Member (4), Volley Ball Captain 
4, 3, 2), Member (l|, Ring Tennis (4); Emblems: 
T (2), H (3), S (4), THS (I): Dance Club (I). 



HELEN BUTLER 
Classical 



MARY LAVINIA CARSV^/ELL 
Diversified Occupations 
Student Council (3); Annual Staff Literary Editor 
(4); Emblems: T (2), H \^]. S (4), THS (I); Latin 
Club (4), Glee Club (4, 3, 2); Dance Club (4, 3), 
Dramatic Club (3, 2. I). 



CECILE CORBETT 
Commercial 



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LOUISE HOWARD 
Classical 



HAZEL HUFF 
Diversified Occupations 
Spanish Club (3). 



BERNICE ALLENE HUGHES 
Commercial 



ELIZABETH JANE HUGHES 
Commercial 



HELEN MARGUERITE HULL 
Modern Language 
Secretary-Treasurer Senior Class (4), Glee Club (4. 
3). 



VANNEHE HUMPHRIES 
Modern Language 
Annual Staff Junior Representative: Emblem: THS 
(3): Spanish Club (4, 3); Dance Club (2, I). 



VIRGINIA LEE HUNDLEY 
Diversified Occupations 
Student Council (3). 




MARJORIE HURLBUTT 
Modern Language 
Spanish Club (3), Girl Reserves (2). 



SENIQRjy 




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BEULAH KENDRICK IVEY 
Diversified Occupations 
Glee Club (21. 



DOROTHY IVEY 
Modern Languaqe 



MYRTLE MINA JORDAN 
Commercial 



ANNE DEENAN 
Diversified Occupations 
Student Council (2, I); Baseball (4, 3, 2, I), Hocby 
(4, 2), Volley Ball (4, 3. 2);Emblems: T (2), H (3), 
S (4), THS (I); Girl Reserves (I), Dance Club 
(2). 



MARIAN LOURENE KELLEY 
Modern Language 
Emblem THS (2). 



DORIS KESSLER 
Classical 
Basketball (I), Volley Ball (2, I); Emblems: T (3) 
THS (2): Dance Club (3. 2). 



MARGARET LOUISE KEY 
Commercial 



SELMA CAROLINE KOCH 
Modern Language 



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EMILY LOUISE LANDRUM 
Commercial 
Student Council (2, I); Secretary-Treasurer Junior 
Class: Baseball (4. 3, 2. I), Volley Ball (4, 3, 2, I), 
Ring Tennis (I). Hockey (3, 2, I); Emblems: T (2), 
H (31, S (4), THS (I): Girl Reserves (l|. 



FRANCES EUGENIA LANDRUM 

Commercial 

Basketball (2, I), Baseball (3, 2, I), Volley Ball (3, 

2, I), Hockey (3, 2, I): Emblems: T (2), H (3), S 

(4), THS (I): Girl Reserves. 



LORENE LEACH 

Modern Language 
Volley Ball (I): Emblem: THS (4): Girl Reserves 
(3): Dance Club (3. 



CLARA JO LEE 
Modern Language 
Emblem THS (4|: Glee Club (I). 



MARY ELIZABETH LEWIS 
Modern Language 
Student Council (4, I); Annual Staff Assistant Lit- 
erary Editor (41: Emblems: T (3), H (4), THS (2); 
President Spanish Club (4), President French Club 
(3), Glee Club (4, 3. 2). 



OELLA HARRIETT LONG 
Modern Language 



SARAH ESTELLE MADDoX 
Cor^mercial 




MARGARET LOUiSE MARSHALL 
Commercial 
Emblems: T (2), H (3), THS (I); Glee Club (2) 
Dance Club (I). 



r. r N T n fi n 




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MARY KATHRYN MARTIN 
Co'nrr.ercial 
Emblems: T (3). THS (2). 



RUTH McARTHUR 
Commercial 



HAZEL McDonald 

Modern Language 
Student Council (4, 2); ipanish Club (4!, Glee Club 
(4, 3), Girl Reserves (4, 3, 2, I), Dsnce Club (I). 



bei";y meese 

Commercial 
Glee Club (2). 



MABEL MILDRED MILLER 

Modern Language 

Volley Ball (2, I), Ring Tennis (I), Hoclcey (I); 

Emblems: T (2), H (4), THS (1); Spanish Club (2). 



MILDRED MILLIGAN 
Volley Ball (4, 3), Hockey (4); Emblems: T (21, 
H (3), S (4). THS (I); Girl Reserves (4, 3, 2, I). 
Dance Club (4), Sports Editor Newspaper Staff (4). 



MARY ELIZABETH MULLIN 
Diversified Occupations 
Athletic Association; Manager Point System (4), 
Member (3); Basketball (3, 2, I), Baseball (3, 2, I), 
Hockey (I), Volley Ball (3, 2, I); Emblems T (2), 
H (3), S (4), THS (I); Glee Club (3, 2), Girl 
Reserves (I), Dance Club (4, 3, 2). 



MARGARET MURPHEY 
Diversified Occupations 



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CONSTANCE VOEGLER COX 
Diversified Occupations 
Student Council (4): Annual Staff, Ex-Officio Mem- 
ber (4); Emblems: T (3), THS (2); Glee Club: Pres- 
ident (4), Vice-President (3), Member (2). 



OTTIE DEMORE 
Modern Language 
Emblem: THS (2); Glee Club (3. 2, I), Girl Re- 
serves (2, I), Spanish Club (3), Dramatic Club (2j. 



FRANCES VERITA DOOLITTLE 
Commercial 



MARCIA JEWEL DORN 
Modern Language 
Baseball (3). Glee Club (4), Girl Reserves (4). 



DOROTHY DOUGLAS 

Classical 
Student Council (2), Annual Staff Member (4, 3); 
Athletic Association: President (4), Secretary (3), 
Member (4, 3, 2, I); Volley Ball (2, I), Hocltey (2, 
I); Emblems: T (2), H (3), S (4), THS (I); Glee 
Club (4, 3, 2), Dance Club (4, 3). 



FRANCES DUNBAR 

Classical 

Ring Tennis (2), Hocltey (I); Emblems: T (2), H 

(3), THS (I); Glee Club (4, 3, 2); Basltetball (4). 



ELIZABETH LURLYNE DYE 
Commercial 
Girl Reserves (4, 3, I). 




CARRIE CORINNE ELKINS 
Modern Language 



SENIORS 




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J 




MINNIE ELLENBERG 
Classical 
Student Council (3). 



JOYCE YVONNE FALLAW 



Co 



Timercial 



CORA FENT7EL 
Classical 
Latin Club (4). Girl Reserves (I). 



NELL FLEMING 
Modern Language 
Basketball (3, 2); Spanish Club (3), Dance Club 
(3, 2). 



DORIS FRANKLIN 
Classical 
Volley Ball (3), Glee Club (4, I). 



HELEN LOUISE GARTNER 
Modern Language 



RUTH GASKILL 



Commercial 



Baseball (3) 



LENA CATHERINE GEHRKEN 
Classical 
Volley Ball (2], Hockey (2, I); Emblems: T (2) 
THS (I); Girl Reserves (2. T) . 



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JEAN GEORGE 
Modern Language 
Basketball (4), Baseball (4, I), Volley Ball (3, 2, 
I), Ring Tennis (4), Hockey (3. 2, I); Ennblems: 
T (2), H (3], S (4), THS (I): Spanish Cljb, Girl 
Reserves. Dance Club 



CARLENE GLENN 
Commercial 
Baseball (3). Hockey (I); Emblems: T (3), THS (I) 
Girl Reserves (2), 



CATHERINE ANN GOODWIN 
Modern Language 
Emblems: T (2), H (4), THS (I): Glee Club (3, 
2, I), Secretary-Treasurer Spanish Club (4). Secre- 
tary-Treasurer French Club [3). 



BETTY GRAHAM 
CoTimercial 
Emblems: T (4), THS (3); Girl Reserves (2) 



MYRTLE ELIZABETH GRAHAM 
Modern Langu,iq3 
Volley Ball (2, I), Hockey (I); Emblems: T (2), 
H (3), THS (I); Spanish Club (3). 



FRANCES GUY 
Modern Language 
Emblem; THS (3): Spanish Club. 



CLARA HAMILTON 

Classical 

Annual Staff Art Editor (4); Emblems: T (3), THS 

(3): Latin Club (4); Tubman Times Staff Reporter. 




JEWEL HARDIN 
Co-omercial 



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BETH HARRIES 
Classical 
Student Council (3, 2, I ) ; Latin Club (4) 



MARY ELIZABETH HAVIRD 
Diversified Occupations 
Emblems: T (3), THS (2). 



ELIZABETH ANNE HEATH 

Classical 

Basketball (2), Baseball (3), Hockey (2), Volley Ball 

(3); Emblems: T (2), H (3), THS (I); Glee Club (4, 

3), Dance Club (4, 3, 2). 



EMILY HERLONG 

Modern Language 
Emblems: T (2), THS (I); Spanish Club Superin- 
tendent (3). 



ANNA HERNDON 

Modern Language 

Volley Ball (3); Spanish Club (4), Dance Club (3) 



NANCY JANE HOLMES 
Classical 



SARAH HORNE 
Diversified Occupations 



HARRIETTE BROOKE HOWARD 
Modern Language 



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BONNIE MAE NEWBERY 
Classical 
Athletic Association (I]; Basketball (3, 2, I), Volley 
Ball (2. I), Hoclcey (2, I); Emblem: THS (3). 



CATHERINE CECILE O'CONNOR 

Modern Language 

Baseball (4. I), Volley Ball (3, 2, I), Basketball (4, 

2. I), Ring Tennis (4), Hockey (2, I); Emblems: T 

(3), H (4), THS (I); Girl Reserves, Dance Club. 



CONSTANCE OLIVE 
Classical 
Annual Staff: Joke Editor, Junior Representative; Em- 
blem: THS (3]; Latin Club (4). 



KATHERINE O'NEAL 
Comfnercial 
Student Council (4); Annual Staff Senior Represen- 
tative (4). 



MYRA PARRISH 
Diversified Occupations 



FRANCES MAY PATTERSON 
Classical 
Hockey (2, I); Emblem: THS (2); Girl Reser^-es (2 
I). 



BETTY PENDER 
Commercial 




LAURA PERRY 
Modern Language 



SEnTIlT 




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MARY EMMA PIERCE 
Classical 
Athletic Association (4): Basketball (4, 3, 2, I), Base- 
ball (I), Hockey (1], Volley Ball (3, I); Emblems: 
T (2), H (3), THS (I); Glee Club (4, 3, 2). 



AGNE3 PLANE 
Diversified Occupations 



FRANCES POPKIN 
Commercial 
Basketball (4, 3), Hockey (3); Emblems: T (1), H 
(2), S (3), THS (I): Glee Club (2, I). 



MARY ELIZABETH POWELL 
Commercial 



MARY FRANCES PURVIS 
Modern Language 
Student Council (3). 



MYRTLE READ 
Modern Language 
Glee Club (3, 2, I), Girl Reserves: Vice-President 
(4), Secretary (3), Member (2, I). 



ANNE LOUISE REEDER 
Commercial 
Girl Reserves ( I ). 



AGNES REESE 

Classical 

Annual Staff Assistant Literary Editor (4); Emblems: 

T (4), THS (I); Glee Club, Treusure- (4], Member 

3), Dramatic Club (3, 2). 



Jnan 



KATHERINE RHODES 
Modern Language 
Annual Staff: Picture Editor (4), Member (3); Soan- 
Ish Club (4), Glee Club (3), French Club (3). 



MARTHA LOUISE RIVERS 
Diverslfed Occupations 



DOROTHY ROESEL 
Classical 
Emblems: T (4), THS (2); Lafn Club (4), Glee Club 
(4, 3, 2), Literary Editor Tubman Timaj (4). 



LILLIAN RUBENSTEIN 

Classical 

Annual Staff (4, 3); Emblems: T (2) H (3), S (4), 

THS (I); Glee Club (4, 3, I), Dance Club (4), Girl 

Reserves (2). 



JEANNETTE MARIE SAV/YER 
Diversified OccupaHons 
Emblem: THS (2); Girl Reserves (2, I). 



MAE SAXON 
Diversified Occupations 
Baseball (2), Volley Ball (3); Emblem THS (I] 



FRANCES ANN SCATTERGOOD 
Modern Language 




ARCHINELL SCOH 
Commercial 
Vice-President Sophomore Class; Hockey (2); Em- 
blem: THS (3). 



SENIQIIG 




Jylalas 



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MYkA SCOTT 
Modern Language 
President Senior Class; Student Council (4, 3); An- 
nal Staff Ex-Officio Member (4); Volley Ball (3, 2); 
Emblems: T (2), H (3), S (4), THS (I); Spanish 
Club (4), Girl Reserves (4), President Danes Club 
(4). 



LEOLA SEIGLER 
Commercial 



RENEE HARRIETT SELDIN 
Commercial 



Basketba 
(2). 



EDNA EARL SHANK 
Commercial 



LORETTA JENESS SMITH 
Diversified Occupations 



MARION .>MITH 

Commercial 
, Volley Ball (2, 1); Emblem: THS 



VIRGINIA SMITH 
Modern Language 



DOROTHY ANN STARR 
Modern Language 
Annual Staff Business Manager (4); Emblems: T (2), 
H (4), THS (I): Spanish Club (3), Girl Reserves: 
Vice-President (2), Member (I), French Club Vice- 
President (2), Member (I), French Club Vice-Presi- 
dent (3), Editor-in-Chief Tubman Times. 



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MARY SULLIVAN 
Commercial 
Student Council (3, I); Baseball (2, I); Emblems: 
THS (2); Glee Club (1). 



HELEN DOUGLAS SUTTON 
Diversitled Occuparicns 
President of Student Government (^), President of 
Sophomore Class; Annual Staff: Ex-officio Member (4) ; 
Representative (3, 2, I ) ; Emblems: 1(1]. THS (I); 
Glee Club (3, 2). 



MARGUERITE VIRGINIA SYMMS 
Classical 
Student Council: Vice-President (3), Member (2); 
Annual Staff: Editor-in-Chief (4). Member (3); Ath- 
letic Association: Secretary (4), Member (3, 2)- Bas- 
ketball (3), Hocltey (2, I), Volley Ball (4. 3, 2, I]: 
Emblems: Glee Club: Treasurer (3), Member (4, 2, 



ELSIE TANENBAUM 
Modern Language 



MARY ELIZABETH TAYLOR 
Diversified Occupa;ions 
Student Council (I), Girl Reserves (I). 



ANITA CLAIRE "TEAGUE 
Modern Language 
Student Council (3, 2). 



LUCILLE TeBOW 
Classical 




IVELYN ELISE THIGPEN 
Modern Language 



S E N I R b^ 



lUBMAN JR. HIGH SCHOOL UKKAItT 




ynalos 



an 



J 




EVELYN ELIZABETH TINLEY 
DIverstfed Occupations 



EUNICE TOOLE 
Commerciai 
Emblems: T (4), THS (3). 



MARY ANNE TOOLE 
Classical 
Student Council (2); Volley Ball (I); Emblems: T (2). 
H (3), S (4), THS (3), Glee Club: Vice-President 
(3), Member (3, 2); Dance Club (4, 3, 2): News- 
paper Staff (4). 



MIMl TORPIN 
Diversified Occupations 
Student Council Alternate Representative (4): Vice- 
President Spanish Club (4). 



MARGARET TURNER 
Modern Language 
Baseball (3, 2), Volley Ball (3, 21; Emblems THS 
(3). 



MARGARET TUSSEY 
Commercial 



MARGARET WAGNER 
Commercial 
Basketball (3), Volley Ball (3), Hockey (3); Emblem: 
THS (2). 



HELON AGNES Vs/ALDEN 
Diversified Occupations 
Student Council (3), Annual Staff Assistant Picture 
Editor (4); Spanish Club (4). 



J/, 



an 



HELEN WALKER 
Classical 
Basltetball (2), Volley Ball (2, I); Emblerr.s: T (2) 
H (3). THS (I); Glee Club (4, 3. 2). 



EVA MAE WEED 
Modern Language 



DOROTHY WHALEY 
Modern Language 
Spanish Club (4). 



NORA ELEANOR WHALEY 
Commercial 



MIRIAM WHITAKER 
Classical 
Emblem THS (3). 



HATTIELENE WHITE 
Modern Language 



MARY VIRGINIA WHITT 
Modern Language 
Basketball (4], Baseball (4. 3, 2, I), Volley Ball (4 
2), Ring Tennis (4). 




JUANITA WILLIAMS 

Classical 

Student Council (2), Latin Club (4), Glee Club (2) 



r. r N T n fi n 




Jylalos 



an 



^ 




ANNE WILSON 

Modern Language 
Student Council: Captain Student Patrol (4), Sec- 
retary-Treasurer (2), Member (4, 3, 2, I); Annual 
Staff Freshnnan Representative; Athletic Association: 
Manager Point System (4), Vice-President (3), Mem- 
ber (4, 3, 2, I); Basketball (4, 3, 2, I); Ring Tennis 
(4): Hockey (4, 3, 2, I), Captain (I); Emblems: 
T (2), H (3), S (4), THS (I); Spanish Club (4); 
Girl Reserves: President (4, 2, I), Member (4, 3, 
2, I): Dance Club (4, 3, 2, I), 



Glee Club (3, 2) 



DORIS ANNE WOOD 
Modern Language 



CAROLYN DOROTHY YOUNGBLOOD 
Modern Language 



KATHERINE LOUISE YOUNGBLOOD 
Modern Language 
February, 1940 



February 1940 
Graduates 



LOUISE ANSLEY 
Modern Language 



DOT ATKINSON 
Modern Language 



LYDIA BRAY 
Commercial 



ELOISE BROWN 
Commercial 



a 



M 



an 



MARGARET J. BURTON 


Modern 


Languoge 


KATHERINE COWAN 


Modern 


Language 


ANNIE RUTH CROZIER 


Modern 


Language 


EDITHE 


DANTZLER 


Modern 


La n g u a 9 e 


MARGARET ADELE DAVIDSON 


Modern 


Language 


EMILY 


GREENE 


Modern 


Language 


CLEO 


HALL 


Modern 


Language 


LUCILE 


HENRY 


Modern 


Language 




^ r N T n fi n 




jyiaios 



an 



d 




CHARLOHE KITCHENS 
Modern Language 



MARY JANE MclLHANY 
Modern Language 



MARY PAULOS 
Modern Language 



MARGARET PHILLIPS 
Classical 



ELIZABETH REED 
Modern Language 



RUTH ROSAMOND 
Modern Language 



MILDRED ROWE 
Commercial 



MIRIAN SMITH 
Commercial 



M 



an 



MARY RUTH SMITH 
Commercial 



SARAH STEADMAN 
Classical 



ALMA STEINEK 
Modern Language 



RUTH TAYLOR 
Commercial 



OLLIE MAE THURMOND 
Commercial 



EDITH WAINWRIGHT 
Modern Language 



ELIZABETH ZOLLER 
Modern Language 




trx-N ions 




^umorSfnior 

BANQUET 



Last vear when the Seniors marched 
over the large log leading into the pine 
forest, they found that they were to be 
Snow Whites. 



The Board of Education was Walt 
Disney, the teachers posed as the 
Witches, while Air. Garrett, because 
it was his duty to take care of the 
Snow Whites, enacted the part of the 
Oueen's Huntsman. 



Queer dwarfs, who "whistled as they 
worked," served the tables, while the 
Juniors and Seniors sang songs which 
left imprinted on their hearts memories 
of dear old Tubman. 

— Marv Lewis, '39. 





I^HB 




Clara Clark 



JUNIORS 



Dorothy Connell 

Evelvn Connell 



Ann Conolly 



Betty Councill 



Olive Cranston 



Evelyn Crawford 

Blanche Crocker 

Xeville Cumming 



\'ivian Cushman 



Ann Daniel 



Harriette Daniel 



Lois Daniels 



Dorothv Davidson 



Elsie Decker 



Jessie Dobson 



Beckv Dodd 



Elizabeth Dunlap 



Hazel Edmunds 



Corinne Elliott 

Frances Etherede'e 



JUNIORS 



Bettv Fleming 



Beulah Flint 



Burdie Fowler 



Jewell Fox 



Dorothv Freeman 



Sara Gatlin 



Emmie Gibson 



Syble Graves 



Vivian Greeson 



Rhuea Hardy 



Clare Higgins 



Mary Hoffman 



Anne Hollingsworth 

Bettv Holmes 



Vera Home 



Dorothy Howe 



Emma Ilderton 

Clara Belle Jackson 



Eugenia Jackson 



\^era Jackson 



Editli jciinv 





JUNIORS 



Evelvn Kinsf 



\'cra Krome 



F'rances Lanier 



Bobljie Lansdell 



Evelvn Alason 



Sara Mathews 



.Mary Anne McCraney 

Mary AEcElmurray 

Geneva AIcManus 



Betty McMichael 

Evelvn Miller 



Mildred Minis 



Alartlia Moore 



Elizabeth Move 



Edith Mule: 



Jane Mulhcrin 



Dorothy Norman 



Anne O'Hair 



Ora Lou O'Hara 

Mary Ruth Owens 

Dorothv Palmer 



# JUNIORS 



Priscilla Pappas 



Bernice Parker 



Patricia Peters 



Sara Mae Petersoti 

Rita Pomerance 



ilia I'rcscott 



Jean l\ae 



Martha Ray 



Evelsn Riiodes 



](Tin Kliodes 



Earline Rodgers 



June Rupert 



Joan Scharnitzky 

Dorothy Scoggins 

Dolores Shmerlingf 



Catherine Skinner 

Elizabeth Smith 

Guila Stanford 



June Swedenburs^- 

Jacqueline Tankersley 

Camilla Tiller 




i^T^^ 




1^ i \ 




Ukm 




JUNIORS 



■-■X~*^-— v-<V' 



^^|^:^^^—- 











iiia 


Vvhaley 

Betty 


Wheeler 


M 


iriani 


Whee 


ler 
Ida 


Ha 


11 White 

Frances 


Whitley 


L 


illian 


Whittl 


e 
Cam 


lyn 


Wieno'es 














Mary Fllen Willits 


:\i 


ary ] 


.ou \\" 


ilson 












C 


itherine 


Woodward 














Anne Wris;ht 



=» — ^j^>* yy/-!*- 



'"'^"'^t-- 






f 



Views of 



The School 




.^ ^ .. *r 




'we love the most" 




Howell. M. 


Lee, E. 


Pound, J. 


Teuton, M. 


Hughes, E. 


Lewis. C. M. 


Pund. H. 


Thomas, B. J. 


Hughes, V. 


Moloney, J. 


Raines, F. 


Thurmond, E. 


Hundley, D. E. 


Markwalter. A. 


Rose, E. 


Timm, E. B. 


Hundley, D. L. 


McClendon, D. 


Royston, A. 


Torpin, L. 


Jansen, M. 


McKenzie, H. 


Shaw, M. 


Turner, R. 


Jones, C. B. 


Merritt, V. 


Sharpe, R. 


Walker, V. 


Jones, L. 


Middleton, M. 


Smith, C. 


Whitehead, L 


Klion, S. 


Moore, M. 


Snelling, M. E. 


Winn, J. 


Koger. L. 


Moss, M. 


Stavro. L. 


Wren, M. 


Krouse, M. 


O'Connor, L. 


Strayhorn, J. 


Wright, M. F. 


Laird, B. M. 


Popkin, H. 


Strother, M. P. 


Yablor. H. 



,^ 



a)! 




Allen, M. 


Brown H. 


Etterlee. M. L. 


Irby, M. B. 


Amos. R. 


Burrum. E. 


Evans, V. 


Ivey, B. 


Andrews, B. 


Bussey, L. M. 


Fell, D. 


Ivey, E. 


Arndt, E. 


Campbell, D. 


Ford, M. 


Ivey, S. 


Arrington, S. 


Couthen, E. 


Gaddy, M. 


James, F. 


Ashe, G. 


Chavis, G. 


Goodson, E. 


Jenkins, M. I 


Baker, M. 


Cheesborough, B. 


Grantham, M. 


Jones, M. 


Beasley, M. 


Crook, E. 


Grayson, L. 


Jones, M. E. 


Beck, D. 


Daley, M. 


Hartley, L. 


Jones, R. 


Beneteau, M. 


Daniel, V. 


Higginbotham, M. 


Kelley, E. 


Bessinger, E. 


Dee, F. 


Higginbotham, 


Key. M. 


Bible, V. M. 


Duncan, L. 


Hill, S. 


Lambert, C. 


Bragg, H. 


Elsroad, W. 


Hobbs, E. 


Landrum, B. 



Jnaios ana 




N. 



Langdon, A. 


Newman, D. 


Rivers, S. 


Taylor, N. 


LaVance, P. 


Odom, D. 


Rivers, V. 


Thomas, E. 


Lewis, T. 


Orr, R. 


Robinson, E. 


Vann, D. 


Lincul, C. 


Pardue. 1). 


Satcher, E. 


Vernilson, V. 


Lincul, C. 


Pardue, F. 


Saxon, M. I,. 


Vignati, P. 


Lively, M. E. 


Patrick, J. 


Scoggins, E. 


Way, A. 


Lowe, A. 


Peacock, E. 


Skinner, M. 


Weeks, E. 


Macky, B. 


Purvis, R. H. 


Slater, A 


Wheatley, M 


Meads, M 


Rabun, S. 


Smith, B 


Whitaker, S. 


Meehan, C. 


Renew, G. 


Smith. C 


WiUohg. E. 


Merritt. H. 


Reynolds. A 


Smith, E 


Williams, E. 


McEleveaii, ], 


Rickerson, C 


Smith, E, 


Williams, E. 


Montgomeiy, ]. 


RickersoD, D. 


Steed, E. 


Willis, M. 



a 



M 



an 





B 



*-is * 



w- 



Jta. i«.-a^. 



J 



Adams, A. L. 
Anderson, V. 
Bailey. L. 
Barrentine, B. 
Beall, M. 
Biggar, E. 
Cannan, E. 
Cease, C. 
Chambers, A. L. 
Chaney, V. 
Connell, A. 
Daniel, C. 
Dennis, F. 
Edelblut, K. 



Edwards, V. 
Erben, D. 
Fields, L. 
Fiske, M. 
Fitzgerald, E. 
Fogle, F. 
Fortson, C. 
Flemming, A. 
Gary, M. 
Graf, C. 
Griner, B. 
Hallman, R. 
Harden, B. 
Harker, M. 



Hurst, E. 
Jameson, V. 
Johnson, D. 
Jones, M. 
Knapp, L. 
Martin. S. 
Matheny, B. 
Mathews, M. 
McCampbell, M. 
McCathern, M. 
Meese, N. 
Michel, C. 
Middleton, P. 
Norris, S. 



Price, P. 
Roesel. M. 
Royal, J. 
Sanders. S. 
SheftoU, C. 
Sims, D. 
Skelton, A. 
Smalley, E. 
Smith, M. 
Stearns, K. 
Stulb, C. 
White, M. 
Wilson, L. 
Wooddall, F. 
Woodward, J. 



AyUL4M7l£/fV 




Alargaret Btigg 
President 








Allen, B. J. 


Bennett. E. 




Daniels, M. A. 


Halfoid, M. 


Anchors, V. 


Bennett, J. 




Dean, M. L. 


Hamby, I. 


Anderson, M. 


Blackstone, 


M. A 


Dicks, B. 


Harling, K, 


Ansley, V. 


Blumke, A. 




Floyd, M. 


Hatcher, I. M. 


Baber, M. 


Burgess, M. 


L. 


Gaddy, M. 


Hendrix, S. 


Bailey, M. 


Burns, G. 




Geer, M. 


Hensley, V. 


Baker, E. 


Cadle, G. 




Gilman, F. 


Hildebrandt,, E. 


Banks, M. 


Canady, L. 




Givens, B. 


Hilty, T. 


Barrett, V. 


Carter, A. 




Grammer, M. 


Hollingsworth, B. 


Baxley, L. 


Cliatt, J. S. 




Gulledge, S. 


Humphries, A. L. 


Beckum, M. 


Coursey, J. 




Gunter, L. F. 


Hurebutt. N. 


Becton, R. 


Culpeppr, J 




Guy. M. 


Hutto, A. 



jHalas ana 




Ingram, A. 




f.uke, D. 


Piatt, F. 


Sizemore. J. 


Jenny, E. 




Marston. M. 


Powell, B. 


Sizemore, M. 


Johnson D, 




McNair, L. 


Ouesenberry, B. 


Smith, E. 


Keilholtz, G. 




McNair, M, 


Riley, K. L. 


Todd, M. 


Kelley, M. 




Miller, K. 


Robertson, M. 


Von Sprecken, J 


Langley, K. 




Montgomery, D. 


Robins, M. 


Waddey, D. 


LaRoche, A. 


C. 


Morgan, N. 


Rosier, J. R. 


Walker, M. 


Leggett, D. 
Lemmons, L 




Mulligan, H. 
Oellerich, M. 


Rowland, A. 
Schulze, B. 


Warren, F. 
Waters, V. 
Williams, M. 


Lichtenstein, 


J. 


Parrish, E, 


Sharpe, M. M. 


Wilson, C. 


Livingston. 


G. 


Peterson. M. 


Sizemore, D. 


Wilson, S. 



a 



M. 



an 




Anderson. J. 


Cox, L. 


Goodwin, J. 


Hooper, D. 


Baker, M. 


CranfiU, H. 


Goodwin, R. 


Howard, T. 


Harden, H. 


Crenshaw, M. 


Gordon, C. 


Hurst, L. 


Barton, H. 


Crinshaw, E. 


Green, E. 


Irglett, H. 


Beck, E. 


Crosby. M. H. 


Green, G. 


Jerkins, M. 


Benson, E. 


Crouch, J. 


Griffith, I. 


Johnson, M. 


Bethune, M. 


Dan forth, M. E. 


Guielleheau, S. 


Jordan, D. 


Bonz, R. 


Danforth, V. 


Gunter, M. D. • 


Keilhotz, B. 


Brantley, H. 


Danforth, V. 


Hadwin, O. 


Kerdrick, A. 


Brinkman, G. 


Davis, V. 


Harwell. C. 


Kendrichs. M 


Bugg, M. 


Edwards, H. 


Havird, H. 


LaMar, M. 


Burcli, K. 


Faglier, B. 


Haywood,, S. 


Lane. A. 


Bush. K. 


Faulkner, R. 


Hensley. M. 


Large, M. C 


Byrd, M. H. 


Ferguson, D. 


Hensley, S. 


Langham, E. 


Cason, K. 


Ford, D. 


Herndon, M. 


Lazerby, A. 


Cawley, L. 


Foster, N. 


Hixon, C. 


Lever, D. 


Cheek, M. E. 


Fredericks, E. 


Hodges, W. 


Lewis, M. 


Cleckley, M. 


Frierson. H. 


Holmes, F. 


Lorg, R. 


Cloud, M. 


Ganlt, F. 


Holt,, E. L. 


Lovett, V. 


Cole, E. 


Goodson, M. 


Holtzclaw, B. 


Maddcx, M. 



jyiaias ana 




McAlhany, L. 
MeElveen, D. 
McKee. R. 
McManus. C. 
McManus, G. 
McNeeley, L. 
Mears, B. 
Merritt, E. 
Merlins, D. 
Miller, M. 
Mitchell, M. 
Mobley, M. 
Moody, D. 
Moody. M. 
Morgan, M. 
Mosley, C. 
Murphy, A. 
Newman, E. 
Newman, F. 
Newman, R. 



Norris, E. 
Nunn, D. 
Odom, J. 
Odom, M. 
Ogeltree, S 
Ov^ens. M. 
Parker, R. 
Peebles, C. 
Pierce, E. 
Powell, M. 
Purvis, M. 
Ouinn, H. 
Radford, V. 
Randolph, E. 
Reed, R. 
Reese, M. 
Reese, M. 
Rhodes, E. 
Rowe. V. 
Rushton, M. 



L. 



Sanders, D. 
Scarborough, G 
Sherwood, Z. 
Sills, V. 
Sizemore, D. 
Smith, E. 
Smith, G. 
Smitherman, G. 
Stallings, C. 
Story, D. 
Strother. D. 
Sullivan, H. 
Sumner, A. 
Sutton, N. 
Taylor, L. 

Tebow, M. 
Templeton, B. 
Terry, D. 
Thompson, M. j 
Tiller, A. 
Russell, K. 



Timmons, M. 
Tmmpler, M. 
Tudor. C. 
Tyson, L. 
Va^A^ter, C. 
Walden, M. 
Walker, M. 
Ward, M. 
Weathers, D. 
Wenner, E. 
Whi'aker, V. 
Whitt, R. 
Wiggins. M. 
Wilder, N. 
Wilson, R. 

Wise, J. 
Wortham, E. 
Wright, S. 
Young, F. 
Young, M. 
Zimmerman, E. 



a 



M 



an 




Bargeron, C. 


Hardy, N. 


McKie, E. 


Silver. J. 


Berry, C. 


Haynes, C. 


Metzger, G. 


Sligh. E. 


Bikas. L. 


Haynes, G. 


Mills, M. F. 


Slusky, L. 


Boulineau, W. 


Henis, A. 


Mitchell, K. 


Smith, D. 


Braurier, L. 


Ivey, L. 


Mobley, C. 


Snipes, D. 


Bugg, C. 


Johnson, B. 


Mulherin. A. 


Stratacos, M A 


Carroll, M. 


Jones, A. 


Parker, D. 


Stringer, M 


Carswell, E. 


Kelly, A. 


Phillips, H. 


Stulb, S. 


Carswell, H. 


Key, M. A. 


Plane, S. 


Toole, M. 


Cato, B. 


King. C. 


Price, M. 


Vance, V 


Cleckley, M. 


Kitchens, M 


Price, M. A. 


Westbrook, 1 


Covar, J. 


Lee, B. 


Rivers, N. 


Whaley, P. 


Dewitt, V. 


Louos, D. 


Robertson, M 11 


Whitley, D. 


Gary, M. 


MacGowan, C. 


Robertson, R. 


Williams. B. 


Hallman, B. 


MacGowman, E. 


Seigmend, S. 


Wong, M. 


Hamilton, M. M. 


McCoy. T. 


Shields, Ga. A. 


Wood, B. 






Skinner, B. 


Youngblood, M. 



Jjuum 



Jjral 



rcu/it?^ 



.a/nd 



rau/n/ 





Marguerite Symms 



Kathryne Rhodes 




Marjorie Bussey 



"/i 






Anne Wilson 




■tc^r 



Constance Cox 



Dorohhy Douglas 



Costumes featured by Saxon-Culluni 




aWJs. 



^ 



^Marguerite Symm; 
Editor-in-Chief 



ynaios ana a Unt 



an 



1939 STAFF 



1-ACULTY ADVISERS 

]\[iss Byrd 
Miss Carswell 
:\Iiss Fullbright 
:\Iiss Gillilaiid ""^ 
]\Iiss Hulhert 
]\Iiss King 
^liss Laiigtiird 
Miss Lucke}- 
Afiss Preston 



^ 



Margaret Heeland 
Erin Cannon 
Harriette 1 )aniel 
Joan Davidson 




Betty Dicks 
.Anne ! follingsworth 
liertha Lee 
Marv Lew is 



Saliie Martin 
Mary .Mel".lnuirrav 
Constance ( )li\e 
Katherine (VXeal 



ALie Peterson 
Aiildred Rowe 
Lillian Rubenstein 
P.ettv Smith 




Allene Summers 
Lucy von Sprecker 
Helon AValden 
Ida Hall White 




EDITORS 

Athletic 

Clarion Arthur 

Art 

Clara Hamilton 

Literary 

Mary Cars we II 

Picture 

Kathryne Rhocle^ 

Jokes 

Constance Olive 



Honorary Members 

Constance Cox 
Dorothy Douglas 
Myra Scott 
Helen Sutton 




Dorothy Ann Starr 
Business Afanager 



THE STUDENT 





^ 



A 







OFFICERS 

President Helen Sutton 

Vice President ..... Rhuea Hardy 

Secretary-Treasurer . . . Mac Cliristian 

Captain of Student Patrol . . Anne Wilson 



FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES 

Miss Belle Walker Miss Edith Naclmian 

Miss Mary Miles 



I 



The girls of Tubman practice self-government through the activities of the Student Council. 



The purpose of the Student Council as stated in the Constitution are : ' 
an appreciation of honesty, to foster sentiments of law and order, to aid in 
of the school, to promote in all ways the best interests of the school." 



To de\-elo]i in the students 
the internal administration 



All students, teachers, and administrative officers of the school are members of Student Govern- 
ment. Tl'ie executix'e and legislative body is the council, consisting of one representative and her 
alternate from each hume room, one representative from each school organization, and three faculty 
representatives. 

The Student Council holds itself 
ready to' assist in every student function. 
It creates and supports all plans for the 
betterment of the school. The Student 
Council strives to maintain a spirit of 
co-o])eration between the students and 
faculty. 

The activities of the Student Council 
are many. It takes care of the school and 
school property. It conducts hoine room 
and chapel jjrograms. The Student Pa- 
trol, which is a branch of the Student 
Council, maintains order in the halls and 
assembly. 

In all its activities the Student Coun- 
cil promotes a satisfactory experiment in 
self-government. 

—HELEN SUTTON. 







ynaios ar?o a JnaYi ^g 



COUNCIL 



Betty AHgonil 
Lorene AiuIlisum 
Marian Artlnii 
Mary Baker 
Catherine Battle 
Colleen Beazley 
Katie Burch 
Erin Cannon 
Frances Capers 
Barbara Clieesborcugli 
Constance Cox 
Jeanne Culpepper 
Mary Ann Daniels 
Joan Davidson 
Betty Dicks 
Jeannette Farr 
Dorothy Fell 
Marthila Floycl 
Lidwina Grayson 
Marv Burke Hatcher 



Members and Alternates 



Betty Holmeii 
Emma Ilderton 
Myrtle Jordan 
Anne Kendrick 
Jean Kerr 
Margaret Kitchens 
Frances Lanier 
Bertha Lee 
Mary Lewis 
Lillian Lively 
Christine Ludor 
Janelle Maloney 
Hazel McDonald 
Geneva McManus 
Betty McMichael 
Patience Middleton 
Juanita Mitchell 
Bonnie Newbery 
Ann O'Hair 
Katlierine O'Xeal 



Earlne Parclue 
Mae Peterson 
Jean Rae 
Edna Roberts 
Mildred Rowe 
Jerry Royal 
Virginia Sills 
Dorothy S'zeniore 
Betty Smith 
Clara Smith 
Denese Smith 
^rary Stringer 
Mary Rutli Smith 
Allcne Sunner 
Dorothy Tanner 
Marguerite To- le 
Louise Torpin 
Mimi Torpin 
Margaret White 
Fannie Mae Wilson 




Anne Wilson 
Captain Student Patrol 



Catherine Woodward 

Xorma Wright 
Mena \ ignati 
Elizabeth Zimmerman 





On 



This year at Tubman, A'olleyball was 
a great success for the Juniors. They 
came through with flying colors. 




Hockey gave way to rmg ten- 
nis. This was not a radical 
change because it has been 
threatened for nianv \ears. 



The Courts 



Basketball is the most popular spi)rt at Tubman; 
and it has been even more so this )ear because the 
Seniors won a tournatiient for the first time. 




Baseball is g-rowing more 
popular each year. The 
Freshmen seem to be the 
ones who enjoy this sport 
most, but the Sophomores 
run tliem a close second. 




ATHLETIC 



Officers 

I 'resident Di>roth_\- Douglas 

X'ice-President Ne\ille Cumniing 

Secretary jMarguerite Symms 

Treasurer Ida Hall W'liite 



Dorothy Douglas 



The Tubman Athletic Association has as its aim, in addition to the ]M-omntion of athletic games 
between the classes, the instillation in Tuliman girls of that spirit of fair play which is known as 
sportsmanship. Besides learning and liecoming proficient in man_\' healthful recreational sports and 
games, a girl may learn to be a good loser and a gracious \vinner. It is to ]iromote this spirit that the 
Athletic Association has been established. 

At the end of each year the Athletic Association makes its regular award nf pennants and eiu- 
blems. The point systi.'iu determines which girls receive these awards. Points are given to.r scholar- 
ship, athletic ability, and participation in school activities. A girl receiving 500 points earns a pennant 
with the letters "T.H.S." on it. When her total score has reached 1,000 points, a girl is eligible for a 
large emblem in the shape of a "T." At 1.500 points, she can get a large "H"; and at 2.000. a large "S." 
But no girl receives her "T.H.S." until she has the recjuired number of ])oints and has reached or passed 
her freshman year. No girl is eligible for the "T" until she has 1,000 points and is or has lieen a sopho- 
more. Only juniors and seniors with 1.500 points are entitled to the large '"H". The large "S" is 
restricted to seniors having 2.000 points. 



The organization of the Athletic 
Association is composed of six mem- 
bers from each class, who are chosen 
by the preceding year's group. Officers, 

too. are elected from the group at the 
end of the sear in w hich they serve. 

The Athletic Association fills a 
delinite purjiose and need of Tubman, 
and is doing an excellent piece of work 
ainonsj- the students. 




Miss Lombard 



liss ijrisendme 



^jyiaws ar?o a ^Mt 



an 



ASSOCIATION 




Members 



SENIOR 

Katliryii Arringtoii 
Dorotln- Douglas 
Mary Mullin 
Mary Emma Pierce 
Marguerite Symms 
Anne Wilson 

JUNIOR 

Louise Arrington 
Neville Gumming 
Harriette Daniel 
Evelyn Rhodes 
Rozzie \'augbn 
Ida Hall White 



SOPHOMORE 

Mary (_lir:stian 
Clayton Daniel 
Joan Davidson 
Jerry Royal 
Anne Skelton 
Margaret White 

FRESHMAN 
Bertha Lee 
Carolyn Mohley 
Marguerite Toole 






,1 :V^ 




GYM 
EXHIBITION 



PROGRAM 

PYRAMIDS 

FENCING 

TUMBLING 

SWINGING ALONG 

GHOSTS 

SKELETONS 

BARN DANCE 

CHINITA 

GRANDE PORTE DE BRAS 

HOOP DANCE 





yjj . THE DANCE CLUB 



Off; 



cers 



Adams 

Allgood, Betty 
Allgood. Sarali 
Arrfngton 
Baber 
Barber 
Barnes 
Barrentine 
Battle 
Beazlev 
Blackwell 
Blum 
Bryan 
Byrd 
Cannon 



President 






ilyra Scott 


Vice-Presiflcm 




Kathryn Arrington 


Secretary 






Beulah Barber 






M 


embers 


Carswell 






Holmes 


Elliott 






Hurlbutt 


C hristian. 


Mac 




Jones 


Christian. 


Mary 




Lamback 


Culpepper 






Matthews 


Cuniming 






McElmurray 


Decker 






Metsger 


Dodd 






Middleton 


Douglas 






Milligan 


Fleming 






Montgomcrv 


(ieorge 






Mullin 


Gray 






O'Connor 


Hamilton 






Peterson 


Harling 






Pomerance 


Heath 






Popkin 




Prescott 

Koliins 

Rubenstein 

Scott 

Smith 

Strother 

Swecenburg 

Teuton 

Toole. Marguerite 

Torle, Marv 

Walker 

White 

Whalcy 

Wilson 

Wright 

Z.mmernian 



, ^^ r> r. ^. 




ftjrr, ■> .-■<.,_ -._j 



yHaLOs ana a ^Mt 



an 




GLEE CLUB 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Director 



Officers 

Constance Cox 

]\Iary Anne Toole 

Cynthia Sheftall 

Agnes Reeese 

]\[iss Dorothy Halbert 



Members 



Alice Adams 
Marian Arthur 
Catherine Battle 
Jewell Barnes 
Audrey Brunkhurst 
Mary Carswell 
Mac Christian 
Mary Christian 
Constance Cox 
Blanche Crocker 
Marcia Dorn 
Katherine Edelblut 
Pat Elliott 
Dorothy Ellison 
Ann Fleming 
Catherine Fortson 
Jeanette Farr 




Doris Franklin 
Maude Gary 
Sara Gatlin 
Emmie Gibson 
Emily Green 
Mary Burke Hatcher 
Helen Hull 
Xancy Hardy 
Anne Heath 
Harryette Jones 
Frankie Kirkland 
Shirley Klion 
Bertha Lee 
Mary Lewis 
Sally Martin 
Sara Mathews 
Mary McElmurray 
Marcia McCathern 
Hazel McDonald 
Patience Middleton 
Mary Frances Mills 
l'"lizahcth Moye 
Edith Mulcay 
Mary Emma Pierce 
Jane Pound 
Rita Pomerance 



Hilda Popkin 
Sara Plane 
Elizabeth Rose 
Agnes Reese 
Dorothy Roescl 
Lillian Rubenstein 
Jean Rhodes 
Leona Jane Slusky 
Mary Palm Strother 
Cynthia Sheftall 
Helen Sutton 
Marguerite Symms 
Alma Steinek 
Mytle Read 
Mildred Teuton 
Mary Anne Toole 
Marguerite Toole 
Ruby Turner 
Rozzic \'aughn 
Martlia \'an Deuscn 
AKvilda Waters 
Helen Walker 
Mary Lou Wilson 
Anne \\"ainwright 
Edith W'ainwright 



'I'lie 1938-1939 sea^-dii of the Glee Club was opened enthusiastically by try-outs for membership. 
All of the classes were well represented. New talent was discovered to replace that of the stars of 
last year. 

Earl}- in the first term we began practicing; the songs for 
the Christmas j)rogram that was given at the Curtis Baptist 
Church. Every member of the Glee Club wore red Windsor ties 
with waist-length white capes. The program consisted of sev- 
eral Christmas Carols of other lands. 

Mid-vear examinations interrui)te(l uur program for a few 
weeks ; liut as soon as they were over, everybody went back to 
work on the yearly operetta. This year the operetta to be given 
was "The Mikado." bv Gilbert and Sullivan. When the principals 
were chosen and the chorus organized, work Ijegan in earnest. 
After da}'S of practice, the club presented the operetta on May 5. 
With this ]>resentation the activities of the Glee Club were 
ended for another year. 

The Glee Clulj owes all of its success to its director, Miss 

Doroth^- Halbert. She has lieen lioth willing and capable as 

director of the Glee Clul). 
.\liss Halljert 




-Constance Cox, President. 





SPANISH CLUB 



Offi 



cers 

President ]\Iai"v Lewis 

\'ice-Presi(Ieiit Mimi Tdrpin 

Sccretar\ -Trea--in I r . C'atlierine Goodwin 




Members 



Betty Allgood 
I 'oris Anderson 
Marion Andrews 
Boljbie Bailey 
Oltie DeMore 
Nell Fleming 
Jean George 
Catherine Goodwin 
Elizabeth Graham 



Emily Hcrlcng 
Anna Herndon 
Hazel Huflf 
^'annetle Humphries 
Marjorie Hurlbutt 
( harlotte Kitchen 
Mary Lewis 
Hazel McDonald 
Mabel Miller 



Kathryne Rhodes 
Ruth Rcsamond 
Myra Scott 
Dorothy Ann Starr 
Alma Steinek 
Mimi Torpin 
llclon \\"alden 
I '( rothy Whalcy 
Anne \\'ilson 




ynaias ana 




LATIN CLUB 



l'raecc])tn'.\ 



Off 



rcers 



Colleen Beazlev 

Cora Fentze! 

Miss Dora Ilains 




Members 



Kathryn Arrington 
rolleeti Beazlev 
Audrey Bruiikliurst 
Mar\ ( arswell 
I nra I'eiitzei 



Clara Hainilton 
Beth Harries 
Constance Olive 
Dnr- thy Roesel 
|ii:intia Williams 




a 



M 



an 



Y W C A 
GIRL RESERVES 




Miss Emma Twiggs 
Miss Betty Jones 



Cabinet 

Anne Wilson President 

Myrtle Read Vice-President 

Mary Beneteau Secretary 

Betty Flem'ng Treasurer 

Betty Jo Allen Program Chairman 

Edith Mulcay Worship Cliairman 

Mac Christian Service Chairman 

Neville Cumniing Social Chariman 

Mildred Mill'gan News Correspondent 



Sponsors 



^■. \V. C. A. Girls Work Secretary 
Facultv Adviser 



Betty Jo Allen 
Betty Allgood 
Lrrenne Anderson 
Julie Barchan 
Bobhy Barrentine 
Anne Belding 
Mary Beneteau 
Betty Sue Blitchington 
Jean Bohler 
Clara Bresnahan 
Betty Byrd 
Erin Cannon 
^fac Christian 



Members 



Mary Christian 
June Covar 
Jeanne Culpepper 
Neville Cumming 
Jessie Dobson 
Marcia Dorn 
Hazel Edmunds 
Betty Fleming 
Marthila Floyd 
Sara GatHn 
Jean George 
Emmie Gibson 
PhvlHs Guren 



Mahira Jenkins 
Sara Mathews 
Margaret McNair 
Mildred Milligan 
Elizabeth Moye 
Edith Mulcay 
Catherine Newberry 
Cecile O'Connor 
Anne O'Hair 
Marjorie Peterson 
Myrtle Read 
Jean Rhodes 
Martha Robins 



Mary Heath Robertson 
Elizabeth Rose 
Jerry Royal 
Anne Royston 
Myra Scott 
Dolores Shmerling 
Emily Smith 
Doris Snipes 
Andree Swancy 
Bettv Wheeler 
Ida Hall White 
Margaret White 
Anne Wilson 
Louise Wilson 




.Jnalas 



a 



Red Cross 

LIFE SAVING CLUB 



President 



Marion Arthur 
Evelyn Andrews 
Mar}- Carswell 
Dorothy Douglas 
Harriette Daniel 
Pat Elliott 
Enuiiie Gibson 
Catherine Gehrken 
Clara Hamilton 



Dorothv Dousrlas 



Members 

t harlotte Kitchen 
I loris Kessler 
Mary McElmurray 
M-ldred Milligan 
Mary Mullins 
Ann O'Hair 
Harriett Pund 
Frances Popkin 
Marguerite Synims 




Alma Steinek 
Ceil Stulb 
Sara Stulb 
Jane Silver 
Barbara Schultze 
Virginia Ann Schultze 
Mary Anne Toole 
Betty Wade 
Anne Wilson 




^aJtt 



an 



-■ _ Tick-tock, tick-tock! 




1 



IN 



Tick-tock. tick-tock! 

Hark I There's the bell from the office 
clock. 

t's time, girls, for work, to leave your 
play. 

The signal to start a Tubman day. 



Xow there's a buzz from the same old 
clock. 

Every girl in her room must be 

Or she'll get a slip, and be marked 
tardy (ee). 



Tick-toc'K, tick-tock; 

.\t each forty minutes to classes girls flock. 

Rotating schedules with great glee they fix 

For whnt's Monday one. comes out Friday 
six. 



SESSION 



Tick-tock, tick-tock! 

At the change of a class, "student patrols" 
are "on dock". 

In halhvays, library, auditorium ;ind stairs 

To. steer traffic, give orders, and keep 
girls in pairs. 



Tick-tock, tick-tock! 

For twelve hundred girls there're courses 
in stock, 

Be it college preparatory, or non-college 
prep, 

That will earn a diploma, when from 
Tubman they step. 



Tick-tock. tick-tock! 

Recess time comes round, girls doorways 
do block. 

In their rush for a "hunkie", a "liot dog", 
a "snicker". 

While "coke" and milk Imttles mid gaiety 
flicker. 



Tick-tock. tick-tock I 

All! here's a verity: we prithee don't mock. 

.\t Tubman, with home ec, music and gym. 

There's only one man. and the girls all 
love him. 

Tick-tock. tick-tock! 

Tubman can't run without her clock. 

Its bells and buzzes, and buzzes and bells 

Sound lorth opportunity — where Tubman 
life dwells. 

— "Mis- jic.ra" 




THE MIKADO 

OT 

The Town of Titipu 

A Japanese Comic Opera in Two Acts 



hv 



\V. S. GILBERT AXD ARTHUR SULLIVAN 

Abridged and Simplified 
bv 

w. xnR:\rAX graysox. m. a. 

Presented By 

THE TUBMAN QLEE CLUB 

Friday Xigbt, ^lay 5, 1939 
At 8:30 — Tubman Auditorium 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

The Mikado of Japan Doris Franklin 

Nanki-Poo — Son of the Mikado, disgtiised as a wandering Minstrel, 

and in love with Yum Yum Marguerite Symms 

Ko-Ko — Lord High Executioner of Titipu Dorothj- Douglas 

Pooh-Bah — Lord High Everything Else .—Cynthia Sheftall 

Pish-Tush— A Noble Lord Pat Elliott 

Yum-Yum I Three Sist- Constance Cox 

Peep-Bo > ers — Wards _ Alice Adams 

Pitti-Sing I of Ko-Ko. Anne Heath 

Katisha — An elderly lady in love with Nanki Poo ■. Sara Gatlin 



Helen Hull 
Lillian Rubenstein 
Blanche Crocker 
Mae Christian 
Patience Middleton 
Dorothv Ellison 



CHORUS OF SCHOOL GIRLS 

Mary Lou Wilson 
Alma Steinek 
Maude Gary 
Anne Skelton 
Mary Burke Hatcher 
Martha van Deusen 



Ottie De More 
Mary Christian 
Emily Green 
ilary Carswell 
Sara Plane 
Rozzie \augbn 
Emmie Gibson 



CHORUS OF NOBLES. GUARDS, AND COOLIES 

Helen Sutton 
Hilda Popkin 
Hazel McDonald 
Mary Anne Toole 
Shirlej- Klion 
Elizabeth Moye 



Frankie Kirkland 
Audrey Brunkhurst 
Marcia Dorn 
Ann Wainwright 
Edith Wainwright 
Catherine Fortson 



Dorothy Roesel 
Frances Dunbar 
Jane Pound 
Mary Emma Pierce 
Edith Mulcay 
Mary McElmurray 
.■\nn Fleming 



SCENE: Courtyard and Garden of Ko-Ko's Palace in Titipu. 
Directed l)v Miss Dorothv Halbert. 



l^ovelij J^20i 



es 



A Farce in Three Acts 

by 

JAMES F. STOXE 

(Presented for the benefit of the Annual Fund by members of Tubman 
High School Faculty under the direction of Marguerite Palmer) 



THE PLAYERS 



^lary Evans 

Bettv Tones 



Mary Lamb, a l)ride in distress 

W'ihna Williams, a constant friend _ 

Caroline Jones, a harassed bridesmaid - Alice Siiinerau 

Minnie, a maid with a future Ruth McAulifFe 

]Mrs. George Crunch, a female major-domo .., Sara Xorris 

Gloria Crunch, a girl in love with love - - Elizabeth Bostick 

Marian van Arsdale. a falling star Marguerite Palmer 

Xanette. a girl from a gown shoppe Amabell Lansdell 

Teresa, a girl with a job Juanita Luckex' 

Sally Rowan, a girl with a nose for news - - ( Jralee King 

Greta, a girl from Sweden Kathcrine Johnson 



THE PLAY 

(The entire action takes place in the sitting room of a suite in an 

exclusive Xew York hotel) 

ACT I— About Xoon. 

ACT H— A Few Minutes Later. 

ACT ni— A Few Minutes After That. 

Stage Furnishing bv Maxwell P)rothcrs Furniture Co. 





BOY'S PAGE 



Boys are such troublesome creatures, 
Even the one with the best of fetaures, 
Yet whether black or red their curls. 
They are still liked by us girls. 

On dates, there's little to be said, 
And wlien it conies to being fed, 
They'll cat you out of house and home. 
And buy you only an ice cream cone. 

They untie our bows, and tumble our hair, 
Which for an hour we arranged with care. 
Such things as that cause us to say: 
"Can't you get nut of my way?'' 

But, if by chance they should leave us. 
Because of a misunderstanding or fuss. 
We would be lost, and ill at ease. 
And long for their endless tease. 

So. if we still want dates, 

We must learn to accept our fates. 

And endure nagging, mistakes, and noise, 

Just to be with our pals, called boys. 

— Marguerite Symms. 



Grandma and Grandpa always say, "What is this 
y.'unger generation coming to?" — we often wonder. 

What would life l)e like williont l>oys? They are 
half of the younger generation and I don't know any 
girl who isn't glad that she is the other half. 

You might divide g'rls into three groups: they 
all like boys; some of them like all boys: and all of 
them like some boys. 

Girls prefer boys ' tall, dark, and dominant." 
"Beauty" is not a necessity — but dominance is. The 
more dominant the boys are the less we get to say. 
The less we have to say, the more we have to listen. 
The more we listen, the more we flatter the boys. 
The more we flatter th boys, the harder they fall 
and — well, you're right back where you started. 

— Anne Hollingsworth. 




BEfflHfflHH 




fssmm 




fflHHIBHH 



iiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiii 




I'lEflBSaSiSfif ^aiMH 



Volume 



Ai'(;i:sTA. c;EOiu;iA. February. 1939 



WHAT SHALL WE SAY 

— AND HOW — 

To T. H S. from T. H. G. 

My dear Tubman Girls: 

I apjjreciate the invitation of 
the Editors of Tubman Times to 
write a little piece for our am- 
bitious young school paper. Just 
among U6 girls I haidly know what 
to say. I am ■ that I do want 

to say fiist th 
ested in what 
I say. Tu 
paper. It pvc. 
tunity for 
You have 
Your first 



WEr)D!N(; NOTES 




"Da Dum Da Dum." Thats what 
lias been heard in Tubman this 
week. Surely you've guessed by now 
thata the Wedding" March. Miss 
Dorothy Hains is no more. Ti 
:nan is trying quite courageou: 
to put unselfish thouKbts 
terribly we will miss her 
us. It's hard *o think of C 
but a traiti 
f our 



DEEP IN DREAMS 



By Betty Holmes 

While sitting before aTi open fire 
is an excellent time to become phil- 
osophical. The cozy warmth en- 
one in a mood of content- 



"An Appreciat 
Own V. S 



ion Of Our 
of America" 




All boys an'#^\s 
age should be« v 
the affairs olJ ^ 
in an in^^ \ 



^s of high school 
y interested in 
rid. We live 
ind exciting 
Id know all we 
all. we shall 
■n burdens 
■fi shall be 
id self- 
the 




STAFF 

Faculty Advisers Miss (iillilaiid and Miss von Kamp 

Editor-in-Chief Dorothy Ellison 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief Betty Wheeler 

Literary Editor Dorothy Roesel 

Assistant Literary Editors Betty Fleming-, Anne 

Hollins^sworth, and Dot Shnieriino- 

Joke Editor IClizabeth Young 

Assistant Joke Editor Betty Timmerman 

Business Manager Louise Bentley 

Assistant Business Managers .... Ahvilda Waters, Frances Brown 

Foreign Editor ^Liry .\nne Toole 

Sports Editor Mildred Milligan 

Assistant Sports Editor Dorothy Howe 

Art Editor Louise Torpin 



Planning and building a newspaper is not l.ard work for those who love 
it, and through the co-operation of such peopl-; has Tubman Times been 
planned and built. Without the encouragement of Mr. Garrett and the 
faculty advisers, we could not have brought to you this paper. Much credit 
belongs tt) the rejiorters and the staff and the students who have urged us on. 

The purpose of this monthly sheet is not only to tell _\-ou what's news, 
but also to provide good, clean humor, to bring forth your talents in the art 
of wriing, and, most of all. tn create a spirit of pride in your school. 

We have tried to make each successive issue better than the last; we 
have tried to learn and profit by our mistakes. And we shall keep on striving 
and planning and building toward a higher goal of literary achievement. 



sm* 



fc:fir. 



r/ 






LAST WILL 



L 




WE. THE SENIOR CLASS graduating from TUiniAX HIGH SCHOOL in the year 1939 A.D.. 
being of unsound mind and unsafe disposition, do hereby l)equeath and bestow our worldly possessions 
as follows : 

Item I. \^'e. the "English 42's", leave to Miss Comev a bigger and better First Aid room, to- 

gether with a richer, but sicklier, group of Seniors, so that she may send the whole of 
the latter to the former every day. and spend the rest of her time counting the money 
gained from the sale of "Reader's Digests" to these classes. 

Item n. We, the Senior History Classes, regret that we cannot leave to incoming Tubmanites 
the cheerful sight of Miss Boatwnght and her old car. "Chuggin" Cholly". 

ilini 111. We. the Senior C's. hereby select the qualifications of The Perfect Commercial Student, 
to lie auctioned off to the highest bidder. The qualities in question are : 

1. Betty Graham's typing speed. 

2. Alary Sullivan's shorthand skill. 
,1 Jewel Hardin's filing aptness. 

4. Margaret Beeland's secretarial capabilities. 

.5. Emily Landrum's English ability. 

6. Frances Landrum's Historv knowledge. 

7. Katherine O'Xeal's exempting grades. 

8. Marian Smith's soft voice. 

9. Mary Katherine Martin's blushes. 
10. Eunice Toole's jileasing personalitv. 

Item \\ . We. the Senior .\lgel)ra Classes, do leave to Miss (^illila-id a brand new joke to take 
the place of the old one about the girl who "couldn't do no problems without no pattern." 

Item \'. \\'e. Agnes Reese. Alary Carswell. Helen Walker. Doris Kessler. Frances Dunbar, and 
Lillian Rubenstein. do leave the fri^jnt corner near the window- in Room 22 to Corinne 
Elliott. Grances Cater. Louise O'Connor, Alildred Pitts, and Betty Sancken, in the hope 
tliat the}' \\ill keep up its noisy reputation. 

Item \'l. I. Mary Emma Pierce, do beepteath iqion l-'rin Cannon m\ ability to take candid cam- 
era snapshots frtjm interesting angles — and I hope her^ "take." 



and TESTAMENT 



Item \'II. I. Frances May Patterson, bestow upnn Rub}- Turner my stron^ and melodious voice, 
in tbe hope that Ruby may learn t.i make herself heard in the future. 

Item A'lII. I, Connie Olive, do tearfully grant my skull cap to Elizabeth Acree. hoping that per- 
haps she may wear it unmolested by uncomprehending teachers, and I bequeath to 
Anne Skelton my ability to carry a tune. 

Item IX. I, Archinell Scott, in spite of long and hard searching, am iinal)le to find an_\one who'll 
have the embarrassing moment when 1 had to tell all of Rotary International that 
there ?re fifteen children in my family. 

Item X. I, (Editor's not;: This girl preferred to remain anonymous), do 

leave to Miss Annie M. ("Ma'm'selle" Page three streamline double dip slips, and I, 
Doroth}' Anne Starr, do leave to Frankie Lanier the two words "Bonjcmr, Ma'm'selle", 
these same to be applied to the said Miss Page once daily, regularly. 

Item XL I, Helen Hull, do bestow upon Betty Sancken my practically new and unused brain, to 
take the place of Betty's own, \vhi.:h by now is surely worn nut from much studying. 



Item XII. I, Audrey Brunkhurst, do leave two inches of my height m a fund; I, Alargaret Born, 
do likewise with two and one-half of my inches; and I, Margaret Waagner. do con- 
tribute to- the same source two and three-quarters inches of my stature. We solemnly 
request that this aforesaid fund of inches be used as an endowment to start a Society 
for Aid to Freshman Less Than Fiftv-h\e Inches Tall. 



Be it known by these presents that this 
last will and testament is signed, sworn-to, 
sealed, and delivered before me this fifteenth 
day of May, 1939 A.D. 

Mary Carswell, X^'otary Whatsit. 

Witnesses : 

XX (The witnesses, two canine friends 
who chanced to be passing down the hall on 
the first floor, .gave their names as "Woof" 
and "Grr.") 





DEAR 



1 )ear Diary : 

We got our newspaper. Gee, it's swell. And we had a speaker 
in chapel. Armistice Day. He made us miss our first period, but 
I didn't mind very much. I got my report and I wasn't a bit 
ashamed of it. I didn't make the honor role, but I might exempt 
three subjects if I study hard. Oh, I forgot about the Symphony 
orchestra. I like that, especially the harp solo. And we had a 
.Shakespearean play, too. "Taming of The Shrew." Petruhio was 
niugh and Catherine was not pretty, but a good actress. I liked 
them both a lot, and I hope we have something more like that. I 
went to the Carnival and rode on the merry-go-round, like a little 
girl again. More fun! 



Dear Diary : 

The Annual Staff had a dance, but it wasn't the best they've had. They 
gave a right cute skit in chapel last month, too. j went to the Athletic Asso- 
ciation skating party. Gee, I'm sore. But now it's the best time of the year 
except summertime. Yes, I mean Christmas holidays. The Glee Club gave a 
program of Christmas carols at one of the churches, and I thought it was 
lovely, I got more presents and went to more ])arties than I can name. 

Dear Diary : 

It's 1939 and I resolve — oh, what's the use, I wouldn't do it. I exempted 
(oh. I forgot, Miss Comey) two exams, I'm getting good in my old age. But 
oh, those exams I did take ! They nearly got me down. Thanks to goodness, 
it's all over now. I passed everything, and this is the second term. 




Dear Diary : 

Oh, I got the loveliest Valentine ! From you-know-who. at that. It made up for tests, book reports. 
operetta practices, exhibition practices. Student Council or Athletic Association meetings, and general 
wear and tear on my brain. But, gee! I'm stiff and sore innn all my labors. We elected the class 
sponsor, the person to whom the annual will be dedicated, and our eight favorite classmates, but no- 
bodv can get at the secret of who was chosen. 




Dear Diar}' : 

The Tubman Faculty gave "Lovely Ladies," and there wasn't room for even 
another of those little freshmen in the whole auditorium, there was such a good 
crowd. And the play was like a Broadwav stage show. But say. speaking of 
freshmen, they're smart. They sold more tickets than anyone and aren't we 
seniors ashamed? I wore a new dress in the Easter parade, then started making 
costumes for school shows. The Gym exhibition was so lovely. There weren't as 
many tap dances as usual, but new and different dances were given. And the 
o]5eretta was the best the Glee Club has given yet — all Japanesey and pretty. The 
singing was pretty good, too. Kid Day — a day for all seniors — I got in the movies 
for a dime and carried mv dollv around all dav. 



DIARY 



Dear Diary : 

Oh, dear. I'm crying- and I never thought I -would. The Junior-Senior 
Banquet and the Spanish banquet are past and gone, and exams came 'round 
again. I passed everything again, and donned the old white cap and gown. 
I can't go back to Tubman anymore except to visit, because I've graduated. 
It was so nice, and I made a lot of fine friends, but I wish I'd appreciated 
Tuliman more while I had the chance — it's no worder I'm crying — but I have 
lots and lots of good times to remember — and 1 can prove everything with 
mv diploma. 




Dear Diary : 

Just think. I have to go to school after that glorious summer. But, anyway. I'll be a Senior, with 
privileges and things. It was nice to see the gang again, and lo hear all they had to say. 



Dear Diary: 

fill, h.en-scales and fish-feathers! So many tests I don't know what to 
<!m. It never rains 1 ut it pours. .Vnd now I know what Lab. is like. But i 
dmi't enjoy it so much. Oh. well. I can go out in the yard and lie down for a 
c! :;it 'ir a peaceful sleep any time I have a study hall. 



Hear Diarv : 

?sIore tests, and, what's worse, book reports. Oh. but wait, you haven't 
heard anvthing yet. Reports, have come out. Oh. well. I'll show everybodj\ 
Thev sav I'm dumb, but thev'll be sorrv when I make the honor roll next month. 





Dear Diary : 

Oh. goody I More nice things ! We're going to have an annual, after all. and the staff has been 
chosen. I'm so glad. The .girls are talking about a school paper, too. \\'ouldn't that be nice? The 
Glee Club is having practices of Christmas carols and Student Council is in full swing now. We had 
some bo)-s down from the .■\cademy to lead us in cheering, but I didn't catch on. Oh. shucks ! 



Prophecy 




Letter to : 

Miss Mary Lewis 
Ambassador to France 
Paris, France 



De 



Mj 



New York Citv 
iMav 28, 1950 ' 



I was indeed glad to receive your last letter telling of the 
unsettled conditions in Europe. Do be careful and keep away 
from air raids. 

You asked that I tell you some news about Tubman alumnae 
of the class of '39. \\'ell, I really have some startling facts to 
tell you this time. Dear me ! It seems only yesterday that we 
were sitting in Time Class beside our fellow classmates, and 
here it is eleven years later. Many things have happened since 
that day in June when we received that diploma. 



After mv work of several months as Foreign Correspondent in South .America I was glad to return 
to the hustle and bustle of New York. Whn I walked into the Interior Styling Shop of Monsieur 
Debonnieure, I recognized Margaret Murphy. Sh e is the popular society decorator in New York. She 
told me of Vannette Humphries' marriage to a famous West Indian planter, whom she met while she 
was teaching Spanish on the Isle. As I walked out of this extraordinary shop, I saw Agnes Plane 
standing at the window of the Sears, Roebuck Building. IMargaret had just told me that Agnes had 
steadilv risen to the exalted rank of manager of Sears. 

I hastened to tlie Carnegie Liljrary to look for the Prize Xo\-el of the year which, as you know, 
was written by Mary Carswell. Helen Sutton, who is now the librarian there, told nie that Harriette 
Brooke Howard had just left New York with her Symphony Orchestra on a world tour. I left Helen 
and went to look for a beauty parlor and soon found an interesting-looking shop entitled "Goodwina's 
Hair Styling." The name reminded me of Catherine Goodwin, our old school mate. Imagine our 
surprise when we found Catherine herself as owner of this exclusive shop. There sitting under the 
dryer was Helen Hull, who was there on business for the faculty of Smith College. She informed me 
that Ottie DeMore is the Assistant Professor of Biology at the University of London. Later I heard 
Helen exclaim, "Lillian !". I turned just in time to see a most fashionable young lady come in the 
dour. It was Lillian Rubenstein, former deb of Augusta. Lillian gave us news about Aliriam Whitak- 
er, Emily Herlong, Helen Butler, Margaret Born, Lillie ( )ellerich, and {_\innie Elkins. 



Miriam is the most sought-after model between Xew York and Paris. Emil\' holds an important 
office with the International Correspondence School in Xew Orleans, where she tranlates Spanish 
letters. Alargaret and Helen, who are teaching adagio dancing, form the jierfect combination for their 
jobs. Lillie and Connie have developed their "blues \oices" and are singing at the Palm Terrace in 
California. She also told us that Helen Gartner has become a foremost connoisseur of perfumes. 



Prophecy 



That night. Beth Harries, .America's liest dressed woman, ga\e a "welcoming party", at which we 
received our friends from all over the world. She had reserved the entire Gold Rotmi of the \'an Aster 
Hotel for the night. The evening was full of surprises. 

First on the program was the outstanding liallet team of ]\rary Muliin, Kathryn Arrington, and 
Elizabeth Heath. 

From our seats of honor we spoke to many of our classmates. Marguerite Symms. founder of the 
Baptist Seminarv in Xew ^Mexico, told us of strange and interesting experiences. Helen \\'alker. now 
the wife of Georgia's Senior Senator and the most renowned hostess in Washington, was radiant in 
red chifton. F"rances Dunbar, tall and stately in black velvet, is the wife of the Santa Ana Racetrack 
owner. Margie Bussev, secretary to the Secretary of State, was there smiling as ever. Clara Hamil- 
ton hardly spoke before she hastened to a telephone. She is a great surgeon, and between oprations 
sells drawings to leading magazines. 

Our conversation was interrupted by the rinnble of drums, and the orchestra leader announced 
that he had ])ersuaded his fiancee. Miss Doris Franklin, opera star, to sing the song we all associate 
with l:er. "Indian Love Call." Bonnie Newbery Hitchcock was there in a wheel chair. It seems that 
she and her millionaire husband had captured the only Jugana ali\e. and Bonnie had been injured in 
the combat. ^larv Emma Pierce came in on the arm of the youthful vice-president of the "Puritannic 
Life Insurance Company of Georgia." Connie Olive was very modest about the fact that she had been 
drawing the covers for the magazine. "Artist Highbrows." The party was a grand success. 

The next morning I turned on the radio just in time to hear Hazel McDonald broadcast for the 
benefit of the Junior League. Following this program. Catherine Gehrke.i and Frances Mae Peterson 
entertained the kiddies of Xew York from the Community Center. 

Three davs later I went to Chicago, and "Dot" AMialey and Jean Kerr met me at the air port. 
"Dot" had just returned from an extensive trip in Canada. Jean found b.cr husband in Alaska, while 
she was there for her health. 

Xell Fleming and Anne Wilson are selling tennis and golf balls for a wholesale comjiany in Chi- 
cago. They had just sold a case of tennis balls to Marjorie Hurlbutt, England's champion, and Mimi 
Torpin, Scotland's champion. 

The first thing that met my eyes when I opened the Chicago Times, edited by Dorothy .\nne 
Starr, was the announcement of Myra Parrish's enngagement to a banker. The whole second page of 
the paper was devoted to the poetry of Myra Scott. 

When I arrived at my hotel. I was so tired I did not even see Katheryne Rhodes and ,\rchinell 
Scott taking pictures of celebrites for the World Press. It was the hotel dietician. Marcia Dorn. who 
later told me that they had been there. 

Hurrv back to the States and let's have a reunion of our famous Tubman class of 1939. 

Aluch love, 

Agnes Reese. 

(By Mary Lewis and Agnes Reese.) 



^Jnaws ano a ^Jnt 



an 




A School Girls Lament 

Wliy, when I rush breatliless up the stairs, 

And reach my room in record time. 
Is the home-room teacher always late, 

B\- meetings kept "til ten past nine? 
\\'!i}', when that last buzzer's rung. 

And everybody's rushing past, 
I) I I drop a book or lose my coat 

And always straggle in there last? 
\\ h\', when I go to my math exam. 

Is it that I know" I'll flunk? 
\Vliy, when I go to Latin class 

Do I sadly moan, "I'm sunk"? 
'\\liy, dear teacher on whom I've a crush, 

Don't yon know that I'm alive? 
Wily, you ugly teacher whom I hate 

Do y u give me ninety-five? 
\\'hy, when I'm cramming for a test. 

And tearing frenziedly my hair. 
Does the doorbell ring, a born honk, or 

The radio shout forth its blare? 
Why, when I am b'ing in the tub 

Am I then wanted on the phone? 
Why do handsome boys I fall for bard 

Care for someone else alone? 
Why, when, settled in an easy chair, 

I vow I just can't rise. 
Does the gang drop in. and while I stare 

Do they all yell, "Surprise, surprise!" 
Now. when you can answer all of these 

And your brain is in a whirl. 
You. of course, will get this answer right: 

"Why was I ever born a girl?'' 

— Jerrv Roval. 



Just Another Day 

You think you won't get up — it's cml}- seven. 
(iec, how you'd like to lie there 'til eleven! 
You push the covers back and, half asleep. 
Out of your right eye you take just one peep. 
Disgustedly you look beneath tlie bed 
To hunt your shoes — and then you ln;:i;!i >our 

head. 
Your socks are bright mint .green, your dress 

sky blue. 
But you don't care; they just will have to do. 
For as you lace your shoes (and see they're 

dirty) 
You hear the whistle and it blows ei.ght-thirty. 
You rusli downstairs and gulp your breakfast 

whole. 
The cook says, "Child, you'll choke on that 

there roll!" 
You run out, reach the bus stop just in time. 
And worry, as you get change for a dime, 
■^'nu stand there wondering about that test, 
.-\bout Biology and all the rest. 
The morning's cold, but you're not even cool 
\\ hen, hurryin.g, at last you reach the school, 
^'ou reach your rivm and Mademoiselle's just 

fine — 
But, sad to say, "Neuf heures et une's" the time. 

— Lillian Kubenstein. 






Miss Page: CTo Doris, who is entering at pre- 
cisely 9:10 A. M.) "Are you absent or tardy?'' 

Miss DowHni;: "Girl give me an example of a 
solitary flower?" 

Pupil : "An old maid." 

Miss Page: "Quel! page avons nous?" 

.■\gnes: "Nous avons Annie Page." 

^liss Lombard: "Dot. what are you doing?" 

Dot: "Nothing." 

Miss Lombard: "Well, don't do it any more." 

Teacher: "What are the three words most used 
among high school students?" 
Freshman: "I don't know." 
Teacher: "Correct." 

Teacher: "You're so dumb, I'll bet you don't 

even know the meaning of the three 'R's'." 
Dumb Pupil: "Oh, yes I do. The three 'R's' run 

all through b'fe. At twenty-five it's romance; 

at forty-five it's rent, and at si.xty-five it's 

rheumatism." 

Miss Comey: "Now, class, there are several 

different rime schemes in poetry. Remember, 
that in medial rime tliere are two lines in one 

rime." 
Class: "(????) But, Miss Comey, the book said 

that medial rime consisted of two rimes in 

one line." 

Plain Geometry 
Given: Esmerelda's liead; one door knob. 
To Prove: Esmerelda's head equals one door 

knob: 



1 


Steps 
.\U men are cre- 
ated equal. 




Reasons 
1. The U. S. 
laration of 
pendence. 


Dec- 
Inde- 


2 


Barry can turn a 
door knob. 




2. Naturally. 




3. 


Barry can turn 
Esmerelda's head. 




3. If you don 
lieve it, just 
her w hen 
around. 


't be- 

watch 

he's 


4. 


Therefore Esmer- 
elda's head equals 
one door knob. 




4 










G 
'] 


iven: I love you. 
o Prove: Y"U love 


me 








P 


roc 


f 




1 


I love you. 








2 


.\11 the world loves 


a 


lover. 




3 


You are all the wor 


Id 


to me. 




4 


You love me. 









Miss Page: (To Mary Emma who is coming in 
late) "1 knew by looking at you that you 
weren't there." 

Mrs. White: "What's the matter wtih these 
eggs. Mary. They taste sort of gritty?" 

Mary: "Oh, the recipe called for two whole 
eggs. I gucss I didn't get the shells beaten 
up finely enough." 

Miss Halbert: (Directing Senior chorus) "Now, 

turn the page and you find — " 
Elizabeth: ".Another page." 

Mr. Garrett: "Now, be sure not to forget that 

book. Miss Boatwright." 
Jiliss Boatwright: "All right, Mr. Garrett, I'll 

be glad to." 






Chaos 



Now, what's the use of gaining lots of knowledge, 

So that some day I can be off to college? 

I know that nitric acid is HNO-', 

And, too, that trade without a tax is free. 

I'm told Columbus sailed in 1492, 

And "say goodbye" in French is "{aire adieux." 

The verb "to l;e" can never take an object. 

And also I nossess a lot of logic. 

It will not do to wear both red and yellow; 

I can't do lessons and still "catch a fellow." 

But I am wondering, as I sit and write. 

If all these facts can help me in my plight; 

It's some Prince Charming that's my main desire. 

To have clothes and beauty, I'd admire. 

NV'hile dreams and dreams, still sometimes they 

com true. 
So be good and perhaps they will for you. 

— Mary Anne Toole. 



The Last Period 
on Friday 

We walk into the room with our feet 
dragging, not much caring whether we lift 
them to go to our desks or not. Our dresses are 
wrinkled; our hair is tumbled; on our faces is 
little or no makeup; and in our eyes is a listless 
look. We finally get to our seats and the 
teacher asks the inevitable "Quel page avons- 
nous?'' We make a great effort and answer 
"Nous avons — ," then stop suddenly until out 
tired brain can concentrate on the answer. Then 
the lesson starts and penetrates no further than 
the ears of some. Others of us listen with a 
resigned air, or act as if we really are interested, 
with nothing else in the world on our minds. 
Imagine thinking of a lesson the last period on 
Friday! The teacher calls a girl. Sometimes she 
does not realize this until tlie girl liehind lier 
punches her in tlie back. Our eyes keep wan- 
dering" to our watches. Will that bell ever ring? 
Wlio ever said that the last period was the 
shortest, anyway? We Ijegin to twist in our 
seats or look out of the window, if we have 
the energy to move or open our eyes. The 
tacher's voice drones on and on. It does more 
to lull us to sleep than to keep us awake. Final- 
ly, the buzzer rings. We all straighten up and 
start scrambling in desk drawers to get out our 
books. With liooks clasped tightly, bodies tense, 
and eyes on the clock, we all wait anxiously. 
The iiell rings, we yell, and scramble pell mell 
for the door. None of us hears the teacher's 
admonishing words, "Young ladies should be 
more orderly!" 

— Sara Hornee. 



Growing Pains of 
"Maids and a Man' 



We hoped this annual would be the best we've 
ever had; 

We knew we just could never be discouraged or 
made sad. 

But some things aren't what they seem, and this 
we soon found out, 

For every member had some grief for all to 
groan about. 

The poems didn't even rhyme, the jokes just 
had no point; 

The faculty. advisers got their noses out of joint; 

We thought we'd make some monej' wlien v.'e 
tried to give a dance. 

But people wouldn't come because we wouldn't 
let tbem prance: 

^^'hen all the staff would try to meet, tlicre'd 
be "too many cooks"; 

The local advertisers put tlieir ads in other 
books; 

The Seniors and the Junit-rs wouldn't have their 
pictures made; 

Though all of us were working hard, still some 
thought others played. 

The editor of art claimed she couldn't do her 
best 

Until the drawings the}' desired were asked for 
by the rest; 

The contribution boxes yielded just one Senior 
"snap", 

It seemed as though for camera shots the girls 
cared not a rap. 

No, we have had no special luck that we can 
brag about. 

But all this is forgotten, now the annual is out. 

Were it perfection we desired, we see that's 
we'd be mad, 

But still we hope you'll rate this book the best 
we've ever had. 

— Mary Carswell 




uAuloqraphs 



0^- 



\ 



ADS 



The Staff of the 1939 Edition 
of "f^aids and a Man," deeply 
appreciate the cooperation of 
the subsequent advertisers and 
heartily commend them to you 
for your patronage. 





Compliments of 



McELMURRAY-- PHILLIPS FURNITURE CO. 



(INCORPORATED) 



FUHIVtTtJKE 



923 BROAD STREET AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



— n— «i^^a*|« 



4..—.- 



so Refreshing 
with lunch 





BUY THE SIX- 
BOTTLE CARTON 



Plus deposit 



Cfu^usta C>oca-Uola Jjotmmj L>o. 



— . — . + 





Compliments Of 








LLommetcLdL /-^zLntLna 


Ll(ympa.nu 




/^ulyUihen 


ok -(-InnuciL 






ihl Ellis 


Street 






Phone 


; 862 
.._ — ^ 



-+ 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 



The Augusta 
Clearing House Association 

Georgia Railroad Bank (S- Trust CofTtpany 

Citizens &' Southern National Bank 

National Exchange Bank 

Uptown Branch Georgia Railroad Bank €*' Trust 

Company 

Alemliers of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



*— • ■ 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Sears-Roebuck & Company 

Augusta's Fastest Growing 
Department Store 

Corner Broad and Albion Ave. on Herald Square 



+ — ._. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



IMPERIAL, iMODJESKA 

RIALTO, and DREAMLAND 

THEATRES 



+ — . — 



— — + 



COMPLIMEXTS OF 

MERRY BROS. BRICK & TILE COMPANY 

FACING BRICK 

COMMON BRICK 

STRUCTURAL TILE 

40 YEARS COURTESY, CAPACITY AND SERVICE 
415-419 Masonic Bldg. Augusta, Ga. 



+ ... 




CONGRATULATIONS 

FROM 
Auaustd's Favorite Store 



— + + . 



Lincoln Lincoln Zephyr 

Mercury 

"60" Q[~ ^J "85" 

H. P. rota. H. P. 



I'roved in the Past 
Improved for the Future 

WALKER-DURANT 

Motor Company, Inc. 

Phone 300 Broad at 14th St. 

Augusta, Ga. 



^ 



^^.a^zJ^CfcM^jy'i^ I 



BROAD AT llth STREET 

"Where Smart People Meet 
Smart Fashions" 

EVENING GOWNS 

For Proms, Dancing or 
Parties 

STREET CLOTHES 

For All Occasions 

COTTON FROCKS AND 
BEACH WEAR 

For Play or Traveling 



Compliments of 

Suarb nf (llnmmtsstinuTS 

Riclmnmd Countv, Ga. 
JAMES M. WOODDALL, Chairman 
FRANK H. HOOPER 
EDWIN C. MERTINS 
FRANK R. MILES 
RUDOLPH P. MAYO 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, Clerk 



I 
1 



Compliments of The Officials ot 
Richmond County 



JUDGE A. L. FRANKLIN 
Juflge Crf Superior Court 

JUDGE GORDON W. CHAMBERS 
Juilge of City Court 

JUDGE JOSEPH E. BRYSON 
Judge of Municipal Court 

JUDGE OSWELL R. EVE 
Ordinary 



SHERIFF GARY M. WHITTLE 
Slieriff of Richmond County 

MR. VV. IN MAN CURRY 
Solicitor of City Court 

MR. GEORGE HAINS 

Solxitor of Superior Court 

MR. DANIEL J. O'CONNOR 
Clerk of Court 



+ 


_„„ — .,. — „. — „. — .. — „. — .» — „, — „„ — ,„ — „„ — „._ 




. , . .-„-.4. 


* — 




• • 


t._„ J, 

TUBMAN HIGH 




Compliments of 




Cldss Rings 

fen- 




a 




Any Graduating Year 

--^^alu^fact^Ired By — 




.i^riend 


(• • 


Herff^ Jones Co. 

H. S. C.^NFIELD 

1560 North Decatur Road 

ATLANTA, GA. 

. ,_, .. _4 



+._.._.. . — . — , — .— .. — . — . + +.— . 



ALLBURN COAL AIC COKE 

Patronize 

AUGUSTA ICE & COAL 
COMPANY 

AUGUSTA, GA. 
HOME INDUSTRY 

Cold Alcne Is Not Enough 



M -M -M 

Ee-li-cious! 




GEOHGIH 

HASH 



+-" ■ 



.._.._„4. + ._.._.. 



Compliments of 

WaLateen L/tua 

"Drugs With A Reputation" 

902 Broad St. — Augusta, Ga. 

Phone 4016 






+ + • — • 



•+ 



.._„ ^ 



Compliments of 

S. Donald Fortson 
Company 

Mill Supplies 

Phones 653-654 

1553 Broad St. 



-+ *■ - 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

Citv Council 
of Augusta 



Georgia-Carolina Dairies 

927 Walker Street 
Augusta, Ga. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

Saiiolieii'^ 

1 ICE CREAM and MILK 



I 



■H- * 



V'i-siturs are cordially invited to 
visit at any time our certified 
dairv. Old Savannah Road. 






College Pharmacy 

Opposite Tubman 

Ever Since Mother Was 

A Grad. It's Been— 

Meet Me At 

Gardelle's 

702 Broad Street 



\ 1 

e ! 

I I 



COME IX, GIRLS! ! 

1 

J. B. WHITE'S I 

JUNIOR SHOP I 

i 

I I IS HEADQUARTERS FOR I 



I 1 

1 1 

1 I 

I I 



THE YOUNGER CROWD! 

The kind of things you'll adore 

wearing, in your size — 

11. 13, and 15. 

White's 2nd Floor 



I 



+ ■ 



The Jones Furniture Co. 



1010 RROAD STREET AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



■+ 



WE EXTEND BEST WISHES TO THE GRADUATES 

The Planters Cotton Oil Co., Inc. 

Augusta, Georgia 
... QUALITY COTTON SEED PRODUCTS — 
PHONE 950 



+,. 



4..__.. . — . . — . .. — ._. . ..— . — .._. + 

I 

1 

Johnson, Lane, Space &Co., Inc. ' 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

Telephone 3047 

ATLANTA AUGUSTA SAVANNAH 






COMPLIMENTS OF 

Woodward Lumber Company | 

COMPLETE LINE OF LUMBER. BUILDING MATERIALS [ 

MILL WORK AND BUILDERS HARDWARE ! 

I 
1010 Roberts St. .... Phone 1161 



"I* ' ■ 



Hulse 
Laundry 



"JUST 

A 
G( )OD 
ONE" 

513 — PHONES 



8087 



MAXWELL BROTHERS 

FURNITURE 

RADIOS, FRIGIDAIRES, 
DRAPERIES 

Phone 400 

933 Broad Street 

Ausfusta. Ga. 






I 
1 

4 



+ — ..— .. — 



+.—. 



Lompliment? ot 

General Tire and 
Supply Compani] 

'Augusta's .Master Service 
Station" 

Broad at 12th Street 
Phone 2600 



Hill Branch: Walton Way at 
Bohler Avenue 

Phone 127 



W. T. GRANT CO. 



930 Broad St. 



"KNOWN 



FOR 



VALUES" 



■ «■ iiji 



Q^ o m m i n s 

Photographer 
737 Broad Street Phone 2314 



4... 



J. S. Fox Cdndi^ 
Company 

SWEETEST AND BEST 
Phone 988 Augusta, Ga. 



I 



— ■-+ 



-♦ +- 



Best Wishes of the 

^Jernifjian ,jr{arclivare 
\^o/nnanu 

\\ liolesale and Retail 

Hardware - Stoves - Paints 

1033-1039 Broad St. Phone 2737 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

. .._. ._. — ._.._.4. 



+ — . 



i 



MARTIN CLOTHING CO. 



I 
I 



Com]5liments of 



I I 



Phone 4471 982 Broad St. 



1 I 



I I 



It r^ays To Be Well Dressed [ 
Always i 

i 

Augusta, Ga. 



"The Shoppe All Women Know" 

874 Broad St. Phone 1207 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

"THE LATEST FIRST" 



.. „_4, 



I 
+- 






L 



COLUMBIA-SEMINOLE 

and 

IVER JOHNSON BICYCLES 

R. L. SUMERAU & SON 

1248 Broad Street 
— .._.._. . — . — „|. 






Merchants Baking 
Company 

AUNT BETTY'S ROLLS. 
BREAD AND CAKES 



^ + — — 



COMPLIMEXTS OF 



Augusta Lumber Co. 



+- 



I 

I 
+- 



Compliments of 

Hugh Barton 

AND HIS ORCHESTRA 



Camp Ton - a - Wanda 

For Girls 

In the land oi the sky. a ten acre lake on a 
500 acre estate, all land and water sports. Rid- 
ing, dancing, art. dramatics, crafts, golf. A 
pre-season will open on June 7. Most reasonable 
rates. For information, write: MRS. GRACE 
B. HAYNES. Director. HendersonviUe, N. C. 



.+ +-.. 



o_4. 



-+ + — ■ 



SPORTING GOODS 1 

BASKETBALL TLXMS | 

R.\nMIXT(^\ I 



BOWEN BROS. HARDWARE CO. 



I 



1 

I 905 Broad St. 



PHONE 94 



Augusta, Ga. 



I 
■4 +- 



i 



DORR 

GOOD TASTE APPAREL 

724 Broad Street 

Augusta, Ga. 



*— 



A. COHEN 




975 BROAD STREET 
PHONE 4268 AUGUSTA, GA. 



+- 

I 



I i DANIELS 

1 I SHOE REPAIRING 

I I 

j Phcne 141 831 Broad St. 

s "There Is No Substitute 
I For Oualitv" 



^ ^^ 

L. I. COHEN I ] 



Augusta Sporting Goods Co. 

'EOUIPMEXT FOR 

E\'ERV SPORT" 



210-212 Eighth Street 
Phone 3280 



-* 



THE GEORGIA-CAROLINA 
BRICK & TILE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

HIGH GRADE CLAY PRODUCTS 

Hollow Building Tile, Common 

Building, Augusta Smooth Face, 

Augusta Rough Face Brick 

Offices: 748 Reynolds St. 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



..-<. 



HILL'S AMOCO SERVICE 

STATION 

AMOCO AND AMERICAN 
GASOLINE - MOTOR OIL 

rransniissioii Lubrication and Greasing, 

Tire Repairing, Car Wasliing and 

Free Crank Case Service, Free 

Road Service, Polishing 

and Simonizing. 

Telephone 9700 

Oglethorpe at Monte Sano Avenue 



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-HoLLemcLn- ALiLUt Clompdnu 

OFFICE SUPPLIES AND 
EQUIPMENT 

103 Eighth St. Phone 4372 

Augusta, Ga. 



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Mills Coal and Transfer Company 

OUR COAL MAKES 
WARM FRIENDS 



520 Fenwick St. 



Phone 3141 



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-H(itLLn6 rl&tbt 

"Fli'wers For All Occasions" 

Walton Way at Metcalf 

PHONES 8096 & 8097 



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Drink 

ROYAL - CHOWN - COLA 

"Twice As Much — 

— Twice As Good" 

i>JE-HI BOTTLING CO. 



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WILLIARD BATTERIES 
Batteries Recharged 

Newton's Service Station 

E. S. Newton, Proprietor 

Lee of Conshohoken Tires 

Atlantic Gasoline - Motor Oils 

Chek-Chart Lubrication 

Druid Park and Central Avenues 

Phone 30 — Augusta, Ga, 

ROAD SERVICE 



RINKER 

PAINT & GLASS CO. 

869 Broad Street 
Phones 74 and 75 



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This Page Made Pos^iljle ThrDUgh 
the Courtesy of : 

DRS F. LANSING LEE AND RICHARD B. WEEKS 

DR. H. W. HANKINSON 

DR. W. EDWARD CLARK 

DR R. I. BRYSON 

DR. ROBERT E. ANDERSON 

DR. D. M. SILVER 

DR. W. J. CRANSTON 

DR. S. J. LEWIS 

DR J VICTOR ROULE 

DR. W R BEDINGFIELD 

DR W. J. WILLIAMS 

DR. JOHN S. PLAXCO 

DR G. T. BERNARD 

DR. A. A. DAVIDSON 

DR. H. M. MICHEL 

DR. R. C. McGAHEE 

DR. F. K. RABB 

DR. JOHN E. MARRIOTT 

DR. RALPH H. CHANEY 

DR. J. H BUTLER 



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Compliments of 

Blanchard & Calhoun 
Realty Co. 



Compliments of 

Local Finance Co. 

H. O. TABB. Manager 
Lnhby of Masonic Building 



Lomplnnents 
of 

Lewis & Olive 

Fine Drugs and Chemicals 

1002 Broad Street 

PHONE 1775 



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Standard Paper Co. 

"Wholesale Paper" 

628 Seventh Street 
PHONE 2487 



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LET US 



Air-Condition Your Home 

foT 

\\'inter. Summer or Both 

Phoenix Oil Company 

Phones 196-197 



Compliments of 

Augusta Roofing and 
Metal Works 

623 Reynolds Street 
PHONE 4172 



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PAUTRIDfiE INN 

BEAUTY SALON 

MRS. PERLE CASAD 
Phone 7227 



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Compliments of 



E EUintt ^am 






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Starr Smith Motor Co. 

PLYMOUTH - DODGE 

SALES AND SERVICE 

521 Broad St. Phone 45(X) 

Ausrusta, Georgia 



rruiimnd INui 



4, _„„ „„ „, 



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irsenes 

"'l"Ke Smith's Oldest Nursery' 
Always Ready to Serve You 



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i}(D OH va [I* un ua ud an an u.i ,.„ u^ -» M..-.J. •}••- 



Com])liinents of 

Frank T. Renick 



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W. E. RAINES CO., Inc. 

BUILDING SPECIALTIES 

Phone 3244 
<S4i Reynolds St. .\usjusta. Ga. 



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H. E. PEEL 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 1 

Phone 1410 
207 Kills St. Au.^usta, Ga. 




COMPLIMEXTS OF 

S. 11. KR!:S8 
& CO. 



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I 1 League, Duvall & Powell 

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I REALTORS INSURANCE 



5c- lOc and 25c STORE I I 

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834 Broad St. 



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Herald Bldg. 



Augusta, Ga. 



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Wm. .Jcnweioerl (Si Uo. I 
JEITELERS 



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Compliments ot 



846 Broad Street 



1 SILVEIVS 5 ^ \{k 
j STOHE 



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The Best in Eats and Sodas Will 
Always Be Found At 

Hill's Cafe - Sodas 

628-636 BROAD ST. 
"Augusta's Only Curb Service'' 

Parking Lot For Your Convenience 



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Compliments 

MODERN INSULATION AND 

ROOFING CO 

646 Reynolds Street 

Phone 3864 

ROCK WOOL INSULATION 



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' McDonald^s 
Hill Store 

1401 Monte Sano Avenue 
PHONE 7780 



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l'".ng-i'a\ ing. Books, 

Fine Stationery., Kodaks, 
Photographic Supplies 
Office Ecjuipment 

Murphy Stationery Co. 

720 Broad St. Augusta, Ga. 

Phone 1780 



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BOWEN AND HULBERT 
COMPANY 

Paints - Aladdin Heaters 
and Lamps 

^20 Broad St. I^hone 3148 



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MULHERIN LUMBER 
COMPANY 

LUMBER - MILL WORK 
CABINET WORK 

Phone 614 

i25 l.vth St. Augusta, Ga. 

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This Page is Made Possilsle Through the Courtesy 
of the Following Augusta Attorneys: 



MR. L. W. COOPER 

MR JOHN L. CHAMBERS 

LEE, CONGDON & FULCHER 
MR. SCHUYLER W. CLARK 

MR. HENRY T. CHANCE, JR. 
MR. LEONARD H. BOLLER 

HULL, BARRETT, WILLINGHAM & TOWILL 
HAMMOND, KENNEDY & YOW 
MR. ROY V. HARRIS 

MR HENRY G. HOWARD 
MR. ALBERT G. INGRAM 
MR. G. R. COFFIN 

MR. AUBRAY J. ALLEN 
MR. SAM F. GARLINGTON 
MR. N. M. REYNOLDS 



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Perkins Lumber Company 



YELLOW PINE LUMBER, ? 
MILL WORK, DOORS ( 

AND SASH 



619 13th Street Telephone 371 






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WiUiford's 

CLEANERS 

432-434-436 Eighth Street 

Phones 3 and 4 

"A Clean Place to Clean Clothes' 



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^ 4,,, Hii JMI im llil III. iiii III. Rii iin mi mi ,i„ nii_4. 



COJiIPLIMENTS OF 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Hotel Richmond ! 



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Houston Ice & Coal 
Company 

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BUY— 

TEXACO GAS 
BOARDMAN OIL CO. 



Lockhart, McAuIiffe £^ Co. 

(incorporated) 
Established 1902 

REAL ESTATE 
FIRE INSURANCE 



807 Eroad St, 



Au<3:usta, Ga. 






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Southeastern 
Fur Co. 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 

J. C. Penney Co. 



STORAGE 

SALES AND REPAIRS 
1046 Broad St. Augusta, Ga 

—ml ml 11,1 ml mi mi iii.^— nn nn n, "' '" ■■ "•!• 



(incorpdhated) 

840-44 Broad Street 

"It I'ays to Shop at Fenney's' 



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You will find the most orig-inal 

for the individual 

at 

■flat & Pzea ^kop 
850 Broad Street 



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CAMP AS-YOU-LIKE-IT 

Little Switzerland 

North Carolina 

Established 1914 

OWX'EI) AND DIRECTED BY 

Mss Marie Gaillard D wight 
54 Broad Street Charleston, S. C. 



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S AV I ]V1 

All Summer Long At 

GETZEN'S FOND 



Season Ticket $2.00 



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Feedrighi Milling Co. 

Au-'^usta, Georgia 
" Your Friends Forever" 



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Standard Finance & Loan i 
Companij of Augusta j 

Grcund floor Ijouf-ern Finance Suilding 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 

P.:oNE 3841 



Conijiliments of 

Andrews Bros. Co. 

870 Broad Street 
Augusta, Ga. 



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SHOP AT 



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IUIHE^'S 

BETTER MERCHANDISE 

For 

LESS MONEY 

lUlliE^J'S 

Phone 2263 916 Broad St. 



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Stdnddrd Oil Co. 

Cd.MPLIMEXTS OF 

J. CLAY COLEMAN 

COMMISSION AGENT 

Phone 188 1339 Gwinnett St. 



Health ani! Fun for The Whole Family 

REX RECREATION CENTER 

BOWLING — SKATING 

Phone 650 
C. C. Reynolds 650 Broad St. 

Owner Augusta, Ga. 



Red Scarborough Phone 2367 

S. & S. COFFEE SHOPPE 

■■ \u.L;nsta"s Best PUice to Eat" 

All Electric and Air Conditioned 

RESTAURANT 

A Specialty Western Steaks - Sea Foods 

Corner 8th and Ellis Sts. Open All Night 



HILL SERVICE STATION 

Walton Way and Heckle St. 

I '< i;ii]i!iiiieiits <<\ 

TOMMIE HOARD 

DeLuxe Cleaners 

DRY CLEANING - PRESSING 
ALTERATIONS 

315 8th Street Phone 3766 

AUGUSTA. GA. 



Lucerne Jersey Farm 

A. E. ROESEL, Proprietor 

MILK AND CREAM 



Established 1894 



B. T. LOWE & CO. 

INCORPORATED 

COTTON MERCHANTS 



FURST'S 

FOR ALL GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 



LANCE PACKING CO. 
J. SPRUCE WHITE. JR. 

Representative 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

MEYER & SMITH 
PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

PHONE No. 4077 
726 Broad Street Augusta. Ga. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

CoLLsicjs. jDzautu ^liojjjjs. 

AlIS.S RUTH CADLE 

1908 Walton Way 



E,xt]uisitc Handkerchiefs. Chenille 

Spreads. Draperies and Curtains 

Made to Order 

MARKS LINEN SHOP 

Phone 137 943 Ellis St. 



■ It" Will Kat It We Have It" 

Home Made Ice Cream 

MONTE SANO GROCERY 

2420 Central Avenue 

PHONE 7286 
W'l-: DELI\"ER 



StantlartI Oil I'roditfts 

ROYSTON'S SERVICE 
STATION 



1924 Walton Way 



Phone 9459 | 

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Compliments of 

BERTRAM DANCE STUDIO 
PLAZA HOTEL 



roMPi.i.\i?;XTS OF 

Carolina Sand & Gravel Co. 

Our gravel has been used for all con- 
crete work in the new Augusta schools 
built durinif past three years. 

BRING US YOUR DIPLOMA 
TO FRAME 

BAILIE FURITURE CO. 

712 Broad Street 



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N. C. ANDERSON MRS. N, C- ANDERSON 

CENTRAL GARDEN 

Aug^usta's Pioneer Florist 
Walton Way and Heard Ave. j 

Telephone 6826 Augusta. Ga. J 

BABY CHICKS 

Georgia-Carolina Hatchery 

1025 Broad Street 

Augusta, Georgia 



Best Wishes to Tuljinan 
High School 

A FRIEND 



COMPLIMEXTS OF 

CRESCENT CLEANERS 

703-7 Seventh Street 



coyTpNFIIIAHtttoiii, 

r PHOME 713- AUGUSTA '• 
SCDTT NIXON, V.P.IN1JJEPT. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
CHIEF C. J. WILSON 



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ALBERSONS WOOD AND 
TRANSFER CO 

405 Harmon St. Phone 491 



BECKUM & JONES 

JEWELERS 

222 Ninth Street 

Walk A Few Steps and Save 

Phone 647 For Correct Time 



CUMPl.IMFXTS OF 

BENSON'S SERVICE 
STATION 

13th and Broad Streets 



DIXIE PIG i 

FRIED SHRIMP " I 

SANDWICHES I 

East Boundry at Broad j 

STARK - EMPIRE j 

Laundry - Cleaning - Dyeing [ 

Plant— Druid Park Ave. I 

PHONE 1811 j 

Compliments of J 

Reliable Transfer Company ! 

Since 1912 I 



SAM'L L. McCREARY 

MERCHANDISE BROKER 

DOMINO SUGAR 

Aua;usta. Georgia 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 

George Walton Beauty Shoppe 

1202 Flteenth Street 

Culpepper- Walker - Greer 
Furniture Cnmpanv 

— Complete Home Furnishings — 
1204-6 Broad St. Phone 1630 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

EDMUNDS DRUG CO. 

502 Broad Street 



SOUTHERN WELDING CO. 

ELECTRIC AND ACETYLENE WELDING 

Auto Axles End Wheels Aligned Accurately 

623 Ellis St. — Augusta, Ga. 



SAND HILLS SHOPPE 

1426 Monte Sano Avenue 
Phone 6680 Augusta, Ga. 

W. C IVEY COAL CO. 

'GOOD COAL AT ALL TIMES" 

Roberts Street and Railroad Avenue 

Telephone 780 

IDLE HOUR FLORIST 

1704 Central Avenue 
Phone 2173 — Day or Nigh' 

FOREST HILLS STABLES 
Instruction in Horesmanship 

Paper-Chases. Weekly Moon-Light Rides 
and Steak Suppers 



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Reasonable Rates 



Phone 7293 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

THOMPSON'S JERSEY DAIRY 

Growing Boys and Girls Need 
Milk Daily 



ESCUE'S MARKET 

Phone and Delivery Service 

FRESH MEATS — POULTRY 
SEA FOODS 

Phones 2780, 2781 313 Eighth St. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

STOVALL DANIEL CO. 

WHOLESALE DRY GOODS 
AND NOTIONS 

Se l!ng Direct to Merchants Only 



COMPl.TMFNTS OF 

EMPIRE FUNITURE CO. 
1201-03 Broad Street 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

F W. WOOLWORTH CO. 



MEREDITH OPTICAL CO. 
OPTOMETRISTS 

740 Broad Street 



HARKINS FURNITURE CO. 

503 9th Street 
Augusta, Ga. 



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GREENE'S CREAMERY 

Quick and Courteous Service 

400 East Boundary 



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"««^N JR HIV.H StnUOl US«,T